Historical Courses for the 2015 Winter Session

Course Listings by Level

Crosslisted Courses

1000 Level Courses
TRH1010HS  L6101

History of Christianity I (to AD 843)

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2014 · Online Course

From the subapostolic age to the "Triumph of Orthodoxy" in the East and the Carolingian revival and Treaty of Verdun in the West. Geographical expansion of the church; the relation of Christian faith to cultural settings and other religions; the development of doctrinal and ethical positions; forms of Christian life and worship; the rise of Islam.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Brian A. Butcher
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
2000 Level Courses
SAH2002HS  L0101

Medieval Christianity (600-1500)

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Development of Church and society in the Middle Ages; its development of thought and piety. Lectures, discussions, minor paper, major paper, final exam.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: James (Séamus) P. Hogan
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 14
EMH2010HS  L0101

History of Christianity II (843-1648)

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Development of thought and piety; monasticism and mendicants; crusades, parish life; papacy, princes and church councils; Byzantium; East-West relations; relations with Jews and Muslims; Renaissance and reformations; reformers; missionary expansion; confessionalism. The course will consist of lectures, small group discussions, and oral reports that summarize small group discussions. Mid-term assignments; choice of final exam or research papers. NOTE: Students who have taken --H2002H Medieval Christianity (600-1500) and/or --H2003H Reformation; Early Modern Christianity may not take Christianity II (843-1648). Perquisite: History of Christianity I or permission of the instructor.

Schedule: Wednesday, 18:00 to 20:00
Instructors: Brian Clarke
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

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KNH2010HS  L0101

History of Christianity II (843-1648)

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Development of thought and piety; monasticism and mendicants; crusades, parish life; papacy, princes and church councils; Byzantium; East-West relations; relations with Jews and Muslims; Renaissance and reformations; reformers; missionary expansion; confessionalism. Lectures. NOTE: Students who have taken --H2002H Medieval Christianity (600-1500) and/or --H2003H Reformation & Early Modern Christianity, may not take Christianity II (843-1648). Prerequisite: 1000 level history course. Primary source, assignment, paper, take home final.

Schedule: Tuesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Stuart Macdonald
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SMH2010HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/06/26

History of Christianity II (843-1648)

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Development of thought and piety; monasticism and mendicants; crusades, parish life; papacy, princes and church councils; Byzantium; East-West relations; relations with Jews and Muslims; Renaissance and reformations; reformers; missionary expansion; confessionalism. Lectures and class discussion of readings. One research essay, one reflection paper. NOTE: Students who have taken - H2002H Medieval Christianity (600-1500) and/or - 2003H Reformation & Early Modern Christianity may not take Christianity II (843-1648).

Schedule: Monday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors:
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 25
TRH2105HS  L0101

History of Theology 2: Medieval and Reformation Theologies

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A survey of Medieval and Reformation Theologies, from 843 to 1648. The Carolingian Revival and Monastic Schools; Anselm and Cur Deus Homo; Peter Lombard and the Cathedral Schools; Abailard and the Universities; the rediscovery of Aristotle; the Friars: Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus, William of Occam; Gregory Palamas; the Reformation: Martin Luther, Ulrich Zwingli, John Calvin, Thomas Cranmer; the Synod of Dort; Richard Hooker; Second Scholasticism.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 340
TRH2105HS  L6101

History of Theology 2: Medieval and Reformation Theologies

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Online Course

A survey of Medieval and Reformation Theologies, from 843 to 1648. The Carolingian Revival and Monastic Schools; Anselm and Cur Deus Homo; Peter Lombard and the Cathedral Schools; Abailard and the Universities; the rediscovery of Aristotle; the Friars: Albert the Great, Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus, William of Occam; Gregory Palamas; the Reformation: Martin Luther, Ulrich Zwingli, John Calvin, Thomas Cranmer; the Synod of Dort; Richard Hooker; Second Scholasticism.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRH2210HS  L6101

History of Christianity III (1648-present)

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Online Course

This introductory course examines the history of Christianity from the Peace of Westphalia (1648) to the end of the twentieth century. As will be demonstrated throughout the course, the major catalyst for change has been, and continues to be, the constant tension between the inherently static nature of the historic Church and the forces of modernity. Throughout the course we will see how modern culture, which includes but is not limited to, contemporary politics, philosophy, literature, and painting, exercised an overwhelming influence on the development of eighteenth-century, nineteenth-century, and twentieth-century Christianity. Two short research summaries submitted online (40%), participation (20%), final exam submitted online (40%)

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: John W. Clarke, Jr.
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 15
CGH2230HS  L4101 · Cancelled on 2014/10/15

The Radical Reformation

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Waterloo Site

A study of Anabaptism and its place in the history of the Christian Church and of the reformation period.

Schedule: Monday, Wednesday, 13:00 to 14:20
Instructors: Troy D. Osborne
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
WYH2244HS  L0101

Revolution, Prophecy, and Millennialism, 1789-1850

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Traces the role of prophecy and millennialism In the context of radical political and social change in Britain and Ireland in the period 1789-1850. Considers the impact of the American and French revolutions, and the Romantic movement in inducing a revival of millennialism in the early 19th century. Examines millennial beliefs and how they impacted broader political, social, and ecclesiastical contexts.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Thomas P. Power
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 10 · Crosslisted to: Theological
Additional Notes: This course would fulfil the history elective requirement within the M.Div. program.
SAH2251HS  L0101

The Reformation Era

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will include a comprehensive overview of the Reformation Era, including: the critical movements of Catholic Reform during the late Middle Ages; the central Reform movements encouraged by figures such as Erasmus, Luther, Zwingli and Calvin; the special circumstances of the English Reformation and the spiritual renewal of the Counter-Reformation. Two Document Analyses, Seminar Presentation, Seminar Paper, Final Examination.

Schedule: Thursday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: James (Séamus) P. Hogan
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8
TSH2401HS  L0101

Medieval Eastern Thought, Doctrine, and Theology: from Chalcedon to Palamas

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Development of "Byzantine" and "Oriental" Orthodox mentalities and doctrines after the monophysite controversy and Council of Chalcedon; failure to heal this rift in theology for the next 200 years, even by two more ecumenical councils. Other theological issues of the period: grace and faith, epistemology and hesychasm, the Creed, and filioque. Selections from key Fathers of this era and from documents of 4th - 6th Councils.

Schedule: Monday, 19:00 to 22:00
Instructors: Richard Schneider
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRH2401HS  L0101

Medieval Eastern Thought, Doctrine, and Theology: from Chalcedon to Palamas

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Development of "Byzantine" and "Oriental" Orthodox mentalities and doctrines after the monophysite controversy and Council of Chalcedon; failure to heal this rift in theology for the next 200 years, even by two more ecumenical councils. Other theological issues of the period: grace and faith, epistemology and hesychasm, the Creed, and filioque. Selections from key Fathers of this era and from documents of 4th - 6th Councils.

Schedule: Monday, 19:00 to 22:00
Instructors: Richard Schneider
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRH2454HS  L0101

Liturgy 2: Baptism, Marriage, Healing, Death

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Byzantine liturgical texts for the totality of life birth and baptism, marriage, ordination, penance, death. Introduction of the variety of "Oriental" liturgies and comparison with "Byzantine". Advanced liturgical theology. Short essay, class discussion, longer essay. Recommended preparation: TRH2453H

Schedule: Thursday, 19:00 to 22:00
Instructors: Pishoy Salama
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRH2641HS  L4101

Israel-Sinai, People, Story, Land

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2013 · Israel Site

On-site study of Israel, studying the people, the story and the land of Israel as it can be known by history, archeology, anthropology, liturgy, and social study.   Please note that for reason of personal security the group will not visit Sinai in 2015. The trip is scheduled for February 11 - 23, 2015.  Separate payment is required for meals, accommodation and travel, amount to be established. For more information, please see attached brochure.

Schedule: Irregular · Begins: · Ends:
Schedule Notes: February 11 - 23, 2015
Instructors: David Neelands
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

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3000 Level Courses
EMH3570HS  L0101

Issues in United Church History

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

In this course we will explore various facets of the United Church, such as the context of the union movement; the founding traditions; the search for denominational identity; the challenges of the post-WW II era; and transitions in its theology, social teaching, congregational life, and organizational cultue. We will be working mainly with primary sources. Lectures, group discussions. Mid-term writing projects and research paper.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Phyllis D. Airhart
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
KNH3571HS  L0101

Presbyterian Tradition in Canada

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Growth and development of the Presbyterian tradition within Canada with particular note of themes which continue to affect the church today. Lecture and class participation. Prerequisite: 1000 and 2000 level history course. Major assignment and book review.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Stuart Macdonald
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRH3725HS  L0101

Liturgy in the Middle Ages

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The scope of what was understood as 'liturgy' in the middle ages went far beyond the bare words used in the Mass, daily prayer and baptism and descriptions of how the services were performed. It included knowing the names and functions of the grades of ordained clergy (which varied from place to place) and their dress, the design of churches, their furnishing and consecration, the calendar of the liturgical year and of course the nature of the music which accompanied the liturgy. Teaching methods: lectures, DVDs of manuscripts, video, musical recordings.

AD students enrol in TRH6725HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Barry Graham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 213
ICH3758HS  L0101

Graces as an Aesthetic Concept

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

For much of the Western art tradition, the concept of grace has been an Important critical concept for Its ability to capture the often elusive quality of artistic affect. Often referred to as the "je ne sals quoi" of art- that something extra that cannot be explained -grace even supplanted beauty for many wrtters (from Giorgio Vasari to Friedrich Schiller) as the highest artistic Ideal. Often missing from modem analyses of the concept, however, are its theological foundations. This seminar style course will exam the concept of grace within Its theological, philosophical, literary, and art theoretical contexts in an effort to understand both its historical significance and its potential usefulness for the philosophy of art today. We will look at a variety of texts (e.g. from Plato, Cicero, the Pseudo-Dionyslus, Dante, John Calvin, Alexander Pope, Friedrich Schiller, Martin Heldegger) as well as works of art for which grace is an important and defining aesthetic concept.

AD students enrol in ICH6758HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 9:30 to 12:30
Instructors: Rebekah Smick
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 3 · Max: 15
ICH3761HS  L0101

Reconsidering Kant's Aesthetics

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Until recently, it was customary to regard Kant as the thinker who gave definitive form to the notion of aesthetic judgment and who succeeded in explaining why aesthetic experience is something essentially distinct from other kinds of experience. The postmodern rejection of the practice of aesthetic theory, however, has done much to undermine Kant's position vis-a-vis the arts. This course aims to re-examine Kant's aesthetic theory from the vantage point of the art theoretical literature that preceded it. In an effort to better understand Kant's contribution to the history of thought about art, it will seek to contextualize such "Kantian" themes as judgment, taste, genius, beauty, sublimity and purposiveness. It will also consider to what degree our understanding of Kant has been shaped by later modernist assumptions about the character of his contribution.

AD students enrol in ICH6761HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:30 to 12:30
Instructors: Rebekah Smick
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 3 · Max: 15
KNH3840HS  L0101

What Happened to the Church? Theories of Change in the Church

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course will examine various theories which have been proposed to explain changes which have occurred in recent years in the church in Western society. The theories will include secularization, rational choice, the Kelley thesis, and other theories found in the work of Callum Brown, Grace Davie and others. The course will involve both understanding the theories and critiquing them, with particular reference to the situation within the Canadian church.

AD students enrol in KNH6840HS.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Stuart Macdonald
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
5000 Level Courses
ICH5155HS  L0101

Albert the Great, Meister Eckhart and Women's Spirituality

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This seminar examines Meister Ekhart's mystical discours and its conceptual configuration as a 'contradictory monism' against the backdrop of the "Dioysian" tradition of Albert the Great (and Thomas Aquinas) and the current efflorescence of women's mysticism represented by Marguerite Porete

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:30 to 12:30
Instructors: Robert Sweetman
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 3 · Max: 15
SMH5285HS  L0101

Russian Theologians

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Historical context and enduring influence of key theologians during the Silver Age of Russian culture: Vladimir Soloviev, Sergei Bulgakov, Pavel Florensky. Reading and analysis of representative works. Seminar, major essay. Lectures, seminars and discussion of texts.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: T. Allan Smith
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
EMH5372HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/06/17

Religion & Public Life in Canada

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Seminar exploring patterns of involvement of religion in the public sphere. Traditional assumptions about church and state, impact of 19th-century "disestablishment" and 20th-century pluralism, Catholicism and the state in Quebec, women as religious reformers, the social gospel, Christian populism in the prairies, ecumenical and evangelical approaches to public engagement, implications of constitutional change are among the topics considered. Informed participation, mid-term written assignment, research paper.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Mark G. Toulouse
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRH5751HS  L0101

Mediaeval Liturgical Commentaries

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Most people, when the subject of mediaeval liturgy is mentioned, think of the old service books which have the words spoken (sacramentaries, lectionaries, missals, breviaries) and descriptions of the action (ordos). There is another class of book entirely, the liturgical commentaries, which goes through the public services, explaining the elements they contain. They were also interested in the ministers of the liturgy, their orders and dress, in the structure of church and altar, in the calendar (temporal and sanctoral), and of course in the vexed question of how a priest computed the date of Easter (no diocesan journals in those days). Teaching methods: shared reading of 5 commentaries with explanations by the instructor.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Barry Graham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 2 · Max: 6
Additional Notes: Location: Trinity College, TC24
6000 Level Courses
TRH6725HS  L0101

Liturgy in the Middle Ages

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The scope of what was understood as "liturgy" in the middle ages went far beyond the bare words used in the Mass, daily prayer and baptism and descriptions of how the services were performed. It included knowing the names and functions of the grades of ordained clergy (which varied from place to place) and their dress, the design of churches, their furnishing and consecration, the calendar of the liturgical year and of course the nature of the music which accompanied the liturgy. Teaching methods: lectures, DVDs of manuscripts, video, musical recordings.

Basic Degree students enrol in TRH3725HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Barry Graham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 213
ICH6758HS  L0101

Graces as an Aesthetic Concept

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

For much of the Western art tradition, the concept of grace has been an Important critical concept for Its ability to capture the often elusive quality of artistic affect. Often referred to as the "je ne sals quoi" of art- that something extra that cannot be explained -grace even supplanted beauty for many wrtters (from Giorgio Vasari to Friedrich Schiller) as the highest artistic Ideal. Often missing from modem analyses of the concept, however, are its theological foundations. This seminar style course will exam the concept of grace within Its theological, philosophical, literary, and art theoretical contexts in an effort to understand both its historical significance and its potential usefulness for the philosophy of art today. We will look at a variety of texts (e.g. from Plato, Cicero, the Pseudo-Dionyslus, Dante, John Calvin, Alexander Pope, Friedrich Schiller, Martin Heldegger) as well as works of art for which grace is an important and defining aesthetic concept.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICH3758HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 9:30 to 12:30
Instructors: Rebekah Smick
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 3 · Max: 15
ICH6761HS  L0101

Reconsidering Kant's Aesthetics

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Until recently, it was customary to regard Kant as the thinker who gave definitive form to the notion of aesthetic judgment and who succeeded in explaining why aesthetic experience is something essentially distinct from other kinds of experience. The postmodern rejection of the practice of aesthetic theory, however, has done much to undermine Kant's position vis-a-vis the arts. This course aims to re-examine Kant's aesthetic theory from the vantage point of the art theoretical literature that preceded it. In an effort to better understand Kant's contribution to the history of thought about art, it will seek to contextualize such "Kantian" themes as judgment, taste, genius, beauty, sublimity and purposiveness. It will also consider to what degree our understanding of Kant has been shaped by later modernist assumptions about the character of his contribution.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICH3761HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:30 to 12:30
Instructors: Rebekah Smick
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 3 · Max: 15
KNH6840HS  L0101

What Happened to the Church? Theories of Change in the Church

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course will examine various theories which have been proposed to explain changes which have occurred in recent years in the church in Western society. The theories will include secularization, rational choice, the Kelley thesis, and other theories found in the work of Callum Brown, Grace Davie and others. The course will involve both understanding the theories and critiquing them, with particular reference to the situation within the Canadian church.

Basic Degree students enrol in KNH3840HS.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Stuart Macdonald
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Pastoral Theology Crosslisted Courses
TRP3120HS  L0101

The Book of Common Prayer

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

After the Bible, the Book of Common Prayer (BCP), in its various revisions, is the most important foundational text of Anglican Christianity; Often praised for its literary beauty and influence, it has nevertheless become unfamiliar or even offensive to Anglicans who worship mainly with new liturgies produced in recent decades; This course will explore the sources and historical development of the Prayer Book tradition from the sixteenth to the twentieth century, the BCP's importance in the history of doctrinal controversy and Anglican identity, and how the BCP's liturgies have been variously received and interpreted over time, including critiques by modern liturgical scholarship; Major themes: the Bible and worship; liturgical language; the sacraments; sin and repentance; individual and community; ecclesiology and ecumenism; the BDP and churchmanship

AD students enrol in TRP6120HS.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Jesse Billett
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Historical
Additional Notes: Location: Trinity Building, TC22
SMP3432HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/05/01

Hist Religious Ed

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Development of teaching ministry of the Church from New Testament times to present. Special attention to various forms of teaching as they emerged in particular historical contexts and to their relationship with other ministries of the church for perspective on current situation.

Schedule: Thursday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors:
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Historical
TRP6120HS  L0101

The Book of Common Prayer

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

After the Bible, the Book of Common Prayer (BCP), in its various revisions, is the most important foundational text of Anglican Christianity; Often praised for its literary beauty and influence, it has nevertheless become unfamiliar or even offensive to Anglicans who worship mainly with new liturgies produced in recent decades; This course will explore the sources and historical development of the Prayer Book tradition from the sixteenth to the twentieth century, the BCP's importance in the history of doctrinal controversy and Anglican identity, and how the BCP's liturgies have been variously received and interpreted over time, including critiques by modern liturgical scholarship; Major themes: the Bible and worship; liturgical language; the sacraments; sin and repentance; individual and community; ecclesiology and ecumenism; the BDP and churchmanship

Basic Degree students enrol in TRP3120HS.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Jesse Billett
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Historical
Additional Notes: Location: Trinity Building, TC22
Theological Crosslisted Courses
SMT3670HS  L0101

Vatican II: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A study of the documents of the Second Vatican Council (1962)-1965) and their contemporary significance for students of ministry. Emphasis is on the historical context, the central theological content of each of the texts, and their relevance to professional ministry today. The course will consist of: weekly readings, seminar presentation on each of the documents, and focused in-class discussion,. Students will be evaluated on class participation as well as three smaller assignments; a background; an in-depth; and a pastoral, integrative final assignment, all of which are intended to assist students in exploring more deeply their own interest in the Council.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Michael Attridge
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Historical
RGT5556HS  L0101

Seminar: Understanding Aquinas on his own Terms

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This is a seminar in practical exegesis of the Thomistic writings. We will review: questions of historiography and historical context; medieval theory of language, including the practices of grammar, dialectic and rhetoric; pedagogical practices of the university; Aquinas' use of philosophical tools for understanding (Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics); key principles of theological method according to Aquinas (science, contemplation, wisdom); kinds of writings and their responsible exegesis. The seminar meets for three hours a week, and relies heavily on in-class exercises. In addition to students preparing for the disciplined theological or historical study of Aquinas, this seminar will be of interest to any student seeking to develop those skills that assist in the understanding of the great ancient and medieval classics of theology.

Schedule: Monday, 9:00 to 12:00
Instructors: Gilles Mongeau
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 16 · Crosslisted to: Historical

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