Theological Courses for the 2015 Winter Session

Course Listings by Level

Crosslisted Courses

1000 Level Courses
SMT1101HS  L0101

Foundations of Theology

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Elements of theological reflection, with emphasis on theological method. Revelation, faith, scripture, liturgy, tradition, dogma, magisterium, the theologian, infallibility, and historicity. Lectures, discussions, short papers, final exam.

Schedule: Wednesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Brett Potter
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 24
KNT1101HS  L0101

Reformed Theology in Dialogue

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course introduces students to the central categories of Christian theology as these loci have been developed in what the Christian tradition has called Systematic Theology. The course will focus on how these major doctrinal themes have been articulated in the Reformed Protestant tradition, and set this perspective in dialogue with other traditional, contemporary, and ecumenical perspectives in theology. Each topic will be explored in relation to its classical formulation as well as with reference to modern (and postmodern) reassessments of the classical tradition in the cultural and global context of the Christian churches in the 21st century. Lectures, weekly reflection assignments, final essay.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: John A. Vissers
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRT1101HS  L0101

Systematic Theology

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Offers an overview of the principles, resources, and central themes of Christian theology - revelation, the doctrines of the Trinity, the person and work of Jesus Christ, and humanity in relation to God. Discussion paper, final exam, class participation.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 341
EMT1101HS  L0101

Theology I

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Introduction to theology, including introductory treatment of theological method, creation, God, Christology, Trinity, soteriology, and eschatology. Requirements: lectures, short paper, take-home examination, final research paper. Prequisite: basic course in Bible.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Thomas E. Reynolds
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

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WYT1101HS  L6101

The God of the Gospel: Systematic Theology I

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2013 · Online Course

This course provides an in-depth exploration of two central Christian doctrines - the Trinity and the person of Christ - as well as reflection on the role of Holy Scripture and the nature of theology. This is the first part of a two-part sequence in basic Christian doctrine. 

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Maico M. Michielin
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 20
Enrollment Notes: Priority access to online classes will be given to students who are outside commutable distance to the college. Students who have reasonable access to the college may be requested to release space for students at a distance.
WYT1105HS  L6101 · Cancelled on 2014/11/20

Teaching the Faith: Introduction to Catechetical Theology

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2013 · Online Course

This course is designed for new students, and acts as an introduction to a number of central pastoral responsibilities: teaching the faith to new Christians, grasping the overall shape and purpose of Christian theology, assessing and meeting the demands of local culture and context, engaging the character of conversion and formation, and finally, grasping an overall shape to the history of Christian witness. The course pursues the historical examination of key catechetical texts from the New Testament to the contemporary period, analyzes their content and purpose, locates them historically, and seeks to engage students' own comprehensive vision of the Gospel, its communication, and pastoral practice. Lectures   on the primary-source reading. Extensive reading, discussion, and mastering of content. 

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Neil Mancor
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SAT1703HS  L0101

Scholastic Philosophical Concepts

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An introduction to scholastic terms and concepts in the context of their use in the philosophical theology of Thomas Aquinas. Readings cover texts that treat the existence and attributes of God, being and essence, form and matter, substance and accident, the human soul and its faculties, happiness, human action, and natural law. Lectures, discussion; short papers, essay, and final exam.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Pamela J. Reeve
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8
TRT1711HS  L0101

Introduction to Philosophy of Religion

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Primer for theological students with little or no background in philosophical thought. Attention to revolutionary developments in philosophical thought and how they have influenced development of Christian faith. Book analysis, exam.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Donald Wiebe
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 214
EMT1851HS  L0101

Surat al-Baqara: An Introduction to the Qur'an

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Located in the beginning of the Qur'an immediately following a short introductory prayer, Surat al-Baqara is the doorway to understanding this scripture and its distinctive style and organization of ideas. The largest chapter in the corpus, it covers the major themes and discourses and is uniquely suited to begin the study of the Qur'an and related scholarship. This course is an introduction to the Qur'an and will familiarize students with the hallmarks of both traditional and western scholarships. It will cover topics such as the collection of the Qur'an, abrogation, mysterious letters and the Quranic sciences. Students will become acquainted with some of the main classical and modern commentaries and will learn how to identify Surat al-Baqara's distinctive structure and unifying themes.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Nevin Reda
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

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EMT 1851HS Quran course outline-2015.pdf447.37 KB
SAT1902HS  L0101

Fundamental Christian Ethics II

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An introduction to the subjective dimensions of Catholic moral theology. Among the topics to be considered are concepts of the person, freedom and responsibility, conscience, aspects of moral decision making, virtue and vice. Lectures, discussions, readings, short papers and final exam; the course will also include a limited online component. (Prerequisite: Fundamental Christian Ethics I.)

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Patricia Murphy
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 16
SMT1904HS  L0101

Fundamental Themes in Christian Ethics

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course explores themes required for an understanding of the moral subject and moral actions. Topics include: Old Testament and New Testament ethics; current ethical theories especially Natural Law; formation of conscience, sin, conversion and the role of the Magisterium.

Schedule: Tuesday, 17:10 to 19:10
Instructors: Moira McQueen
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
2000 Level Courses
WYT2101HS  L0101

The Bride of the Lamb: Systematic Theology II

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course explores the activity of God from creation to new creation, with special emphasis on the Spirit's work in the Church. We also examine the image of God in the human person and the nature of sin. This course presupposes Systematic Theology I. Lectures, tutorials. Short papers, final exam. 

Schedule: Wednesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Timothy Connor
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Tutorial
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Biblical
EMT2102HS  L0101

Theology II

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

In this course, students work on constructing their own theologies of salvation (soteriology) in dialogue with questions raised by key historical and contemporary theologians.  We will explore soteriology as it relates to theologies of atonement, sin and evil, creation, redemption and eschatology, and the roles played by God and humanity and the person and work of Jesus Christ in processes of redemption.  We also explore how key historical movements of social and theological change, as well as pressing, contemporary pastoral questions related to gender-based violence, political and social liberation movements, global Christianity, and inter-faith relations contribute to our own understandings of salvation.  Student work will be evaluated based on participation, short figure-based interpretive papers, and a final integrative, constructive theological paper.  Prerequisite: one introductory course in systematic theology.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Natalie Wigg-Stevenson
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

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SAT2222HS  L0101

Mystery of the Trinity

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Mystery of the Triune God with its Biblical sources and Patristic development, and an examination of the development of the understanding of the Immanent Trinity, with attention paid to particular issues, e.g. Filioque, notion of 'Person'. Also stressed is the development of a Trinitarian spirituality with some attention to the mystics. Lectures, mid-term test, end of term test.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Gregory H. Carruthers
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SAT2223HS  L6101

The Christian God

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Online Course

This course considers basic themes in the theology of the Holy Trinity from a biblical, historical and systematic viewpoint and addresses selected contemporary questions about the mystery of the tri-personal God.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Peter Gittens
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 25
SMT2223HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/05/01

Mystery of the Triune God

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Mystery of God Triune: biblical, liturgical, historical, and contemporary theology on the Trinity. Question of God in human experience, atheism, Trinitarian debates, feminist perspectives, the Trinity in the economy of salvation, implications for prayer. Lectures, discussions, short paper, final exam.

Schedule: Wednesday, 17:00 to 19:00
Instructors: Darren Dias
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 36
SAT2242HS  L0101

Christology

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Answering Jesus' question: "Who do people say I am?", course uses Old Testament expectations, New Testament data, Conciliar definitions and contemporary issues. Lectures, mid-term test, final exam.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Josephine Lombardi
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT2321HS  L0101

Creation, Man/Woman, Sin

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Christian doctrine of creation; its scriptural foundation in Old and New Testaments; its difference from Greek philosophical theories; its history to present; its relation to evolution; contemporary theories. Man/woman: their nature and relationship to God and the world as understood in history of Christian thought. Monogenism vs. polygenism. The problem of evil, original sin and sin of the world. Lectures and discussion. Paper.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Ovey N. Mohammed
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 16
SMT2328HS  L0101

Creation, Fall, Grace and Glory

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Christian anthropology, focussing on theology of creation, human nature, the fall and original sin, transformation by grace, eschatological call to glory. Biblical, historical, liturgical, and contemporary theological reflection, emphasis on contemporary reinterpretation of creation theology, problem of evil, and grace. Lectures, discussions, short papers, final exam.

Schedule: Wednesday, 17:00 to 19:00
Instructors: Darren Dias
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 36
SAT2331HS  L0101

Grace and Glory

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The second course on Theological Anthropology comprises two main sections, Grace and Glory: (1) God's universal salvific will in predestination. Christian Justification and the new creation in Christ. The new life in Christ through the interior journey and working within the Church for the world. (2) Eschatology, the fulfillment of grace. One midterm test, one mini-synthesis, and a final oral examination.

Schedule: Friday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Charles Anang
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT2341HS  L0101

Eschatology

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Introduction to the teachings of the Christian Church and theological understanding concerning eschatology both as it has developed in the tradition and in the renewed interest it has gained from some of the significant theologians of the 20th C. Topics include: philosophical foundations, eschatology in the OT and NT, immortality and resurrection, theology of death and afterlife, individual and communal judgement, parousia, apocalyptic, political eschatology. Short paper, book review, final exam, class participation.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: John Dadosky
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 16
SAT2401HS  L0101

Ecclesiology

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The mystery of the Church as seen in the light of Vatican II. Her foundation in Christ in Scripture and history that gives rise to her structure, mission, and four Marks. Mary as the Mother of the Church and eschatological icon. One midterm test, one mini-synthesis and a final oral examination.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Mark Robson
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 14
SMT2404HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/07/24

Ecclesiology

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Jesus' preaching of the reign of God; development of ecclesial structures; ministries in the church; mission, service, and witness in the Church today, contemporary issues leading to and arising from Vatican II. Lectures, discussions, research paper, take-home exam.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: TBA
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Enrollment Notes: THIS COURSE WILL BE OFFERED UNDER A DIFFERENT NUMBER AT A 3000 6000 SPLIT COURSE IN THE 2014 FALL TERM.  More information to be announced or contact usmctheology.registrar@utoronto.ca 
SAT2432HS  L0101

Sacramental Theology II

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Historical and systematic study of the sacraments of healing (penance and anointing of the sick) and sacraments of growth (marriage and orders) with special consideration of the pastoral viewpoint. Three short papers, seminars, final exam.

Schedule: Friday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Mark Robson
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SAT2433HS  L6101

Sacraments

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2013 · Online Course

This course considers the sacraments of the Catholic Church as the means whereby Christians are mystically united to the life of Christ.   While a historical approach places course material in context, direct attention is focused upon the theological dimensions of Christ as the primordial sacrament, the Church as the sacrament of Christ, and the sevenfold sacraments as privileged, engraced ways of encountering the risen God-man.  Lectures, post-response exercises, annotated bibliography, multiple choice reading quizzes, and integrative summative task (2 options).

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Donald Graham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 25
SMT2433HS  L0101

Sacramental Life

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Biblical, historical, systematic, and pastoral study of sacraments of initiation (baptism, confirmation, Eucharist), sacraments of healing (reconciliation, sacrament of the sick), sacraments of vocation (marriage and vocation). Readings, lectures, discussions, weekly assignments, short papers or research paper.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Darren Dias
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
WYT2505HS  L0101

Introduction to Anglican Theology: Ways of Reading the Bible in the English Church and Anglican Communion

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This is a survey course in Anglican theology that will involve extensive reading. Using the lens of Scriptural interpretation as a way of approaching the sweep of Anglican theological thinking, this course will survey chronologically a broad range Anglican readers of Scripture in an attempt to gauge the development of the larger religious vision of Anglicanism over time. Beginning with Wycliffe, the course will move through a number of writers into the early 20th century, and end with some recent statements on the reading of Scripture from around the Anglican Communion. Lectures and weekly tutorials on the primary-source readings. Weekly content quizzes; midterm; final exam.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 13:00
Schedule Notes: two 90 min sessions 9:00 to 10:30 then 11:30 to 13:00 with 1 hr break
Instructors: Ephraim Radner
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Enrollment Notes: This course is a required course for all Anglican M.Div. students, normally completed in the second year (or equivalent) of the program and an elective choice for all basic degree students. It is also a required course within the Cetificate of Anglican Studies program.
TRT2611HS  L6101

Twentieth Century Anglican Theology

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Online Course

The purpose of this course is to familiarize students with some of the theological trends and voices characterizing Anglican theology in the twentieth century, as well as to consider how these voices and movements can be integrated into contemporary pastoral and ministerial practice. Theologians to be studied include: Gore, Underhill, Temple, Mascall, Pittenger, Macquarrie, Sykes, Heyward, Tutu, Williams, and others. Theological trends will include modernism, spirituality, liturgical renewal, Anglo-Catholicism, process thought, incarnation, feminism, political and liberation theology, etc. The course will conclude with a consideration of future trends in Anglican theology. Weekly readings, two short essays, class presentation.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Matthew P. Cadwell
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRT2621HS  L0101

Christian Missiology

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A survey of Christian missiology including the biblical basis of Christian mission and cross-cultural mission and ministry; theology of mission; Christianity and culture; history of Christian mission; global Christianity and mission today; mission, evangelism and other faiths; mission globalization and the electronic media; mission and justice, peace, reconciliation and the environment; mission and personhood; Christian anthropology and the anthropology of Christianity; and the future of Christian mission.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Terry M. Brown
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 340
SAT2701HS  L0101

Philosophy of Religion

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A survey of some of the main themes in philosophy of religion including: faith and reason, religious experience, divine attributes, the problem of evil, petitionary prayer, miracles, and religious diversity. Lectures and discussion; short papers and essay.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Pamela J. Reeve
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 14
SAT2706HS  L0101

Introduction to Metaphysics

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course is a philosophical examination of some fundamental questions in Christian metaphysics: Can we prove that God exists?  What is God like?  What is creation?  How are God and creation related?  More particularly, if God created everything, how do evolution and the Big Bang fit into the picture?  We will attempt to formulate our own answers to each of these questions; but our discussion will make constant reference to the answers already present in the Christian tradition, especially to those of Thomas Aquinas. Lectures, discussions, short papers and final exam.

Schedule: Friday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Sean Mulrooney
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 20
SAT2707HS  L0101

Introduction to Moral Philosophy

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An examination of three different approaches to ethics. First, we will look at the foundations of Western morality through reading Plato's Gorgias; second, at Nietzsche's attack on Western morality in Beyond Good & Evil; and third at Aquinas' treatment of the virtues. Lectures, discussions, short papers, final exam.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Sean Mulrooney
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT2726HS  L0101

Revolutions in 19th-Century European Thought

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The 19th century was a time of great political and intellectual ferment. In particular, it was the century in which Europeans came to develop a keen sense of historical consciousness. Come find out how Hegel, Kierkegaard, Marx, Darwin, Nietzsche and Freud forever changed the way we look at the world. Themes to be considered include history, human nature, morality, religion and God. We will also focus on the problem of how the different academic disciplines are related to one another.

We will consider each thinker's ideas in their historical context and in light of their implications for contemporary culture and for our own thinking.

Schedule: Tuesday, 09:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Sean Mulrooney
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 16
TRT2802HS  L0101

Beyond Homelessness

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A study of the nature of postmodern homelessness in the light of a theological and phenomenological analysis of homecoming and homemaking. Biblical themes such as creation, exodus, covenant, land and kingdom will be interpreted in the context of present experiences of social homelessness, geo-political violence, international refugees, disconnectedness to the earth and an overwhelming sense of being nomads without roots in any place of community. Seminar. Evaluation: Class Participation 25%, reflection papers or one major essay 75%.

Schedule: Tuesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Schedule Notes: Location: CRC Wycliffe
Instructors: Brian Walsh
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT2810HS  L0101

Pastoral Competency

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A review of the moral, pastoral and canonical principles of sound ministerial practice in the Roman Catholic tradition, along with an intensive practicum. Online component, lecture, discussion, tutoring. For lay students and ordination candidates in the M.Div. program at Regis College only. Oral Examination for pass/fail credit. Prerequisite: permission of the Regis College M.Div. Director.

 

Schedule: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, 09:00 to 15:00 · Begins: 04/13 · Ends: 04/21
Instructors: Gilles Mongeau
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 12
TRT2811HS  L4101

Radical Hospitality: Interdisciplinary Perspectives and Practices

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (other off-campus location) Site

This course will introduce students to three dimensions of hospitality, with the aim of having students construct their own theology of radical hospitality. The phenomenon of hospitality: something of its history, theology, and practice in the Christian tradition. The concept of hospitality: attending to some of the 20th century philosophical reflections on the theme. The concrete practice of hospitality as it is described by guest lecturers and experienced in a pre-arranged hospitality practicum. Sessions will alternate between guest lectures and seminar-style discussions. Students will participate in, and write a reflection paper on, a hospitality practicum, review one contemporary theology of hospitality, and write one research paper.

Schedule: Thursday, 19:00 to 21:00
Schedule Notes: Location: Church of Epiphany & St. Mark, 201 Cowan Ave, Parkdale.
Instructors: Jason McKinney
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
WYT2912HS  L6101

The Drama of Christian Ethics

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Online Course

This course is designed as an introduction to the field of Christian ethics, not as a cerebral and academic discipline but as a lived, embodied Christian reality. It is designed with the intent of providing the student with a framework through which to understand what it means to live as the church within the complexities of the social, moral, and political world of the 21st century. The themes of drama, narrative, acting, and especially "improvisation" provide the conceptual lens through which we will engage various ethical complexities such as genetic-bio-ethical issues, sexuality, family and marriage, pacifism and war, or ecological ethics. This will be an online course with a written lecture format, weekly readings, student participation in weekly discussion questions, one minor assignment, and a final major paper.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Patrick McManus
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 10 · Max: 20
Enrollment Notes: Priority will be given to students who live outside commutable distance to Wycliffe. Students who have access to the college in some circumstances may be asked to release a space for such a distance student. 
TRT2942HS  L0101

Ethics and Society

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The primary goal of this course is to help us think critically and sensitively about Christian values, norms, and commitments in ways that preserve a Christian orientation while taking into account the non-Christian and pluralistic context of modern society. Such thinking will involve a dialectical process where universal principles, values, and norms will be examined with reference to the particular experiences and realities that constrain human action and interaction. The aim is not to structure a strict formalistic ethical framework but rather to canvall various ethical methodologies, religious and secular, as resources for ethical thinking and praxis. Method of Evaluation: Critical book response(s), one term paper; class participation.

Schedule: Wednesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Donald Wiebe
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 213
TRT2953HS  L0101

Biblical Theology in the Shadow of Empire

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course seeks to engender a biblical theology in the shadow of empire. In all times of history, the people of God are called to navigate a covenantal faith in the midst of conflicted visions of life and cultural practice. The biblical narrative is shaped, lived and told anew in contest with other grand narratives, overwhelmingly imperial in character. What does the reign of God look like when set in the context of other hegemonic claims to sovereignty? That is a question that resonates throughout the biblical witness and needs to be asked of every generation.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Brian Walsh
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
3000 Level Courses
RGT3222HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2012/07/21

God, One and Triune

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Close textual study of the Scriptural sources and dogmatic development of the Church's reflection on the identity of the God who is revealed in Jesus the Christ. Students develop a systematic understanding of this material, leading to a personal and critical appropriation of the tradition in light of preparation for pastoral and theological leadership in the Church. Lectures and seminars. Assignments for 3222: exegetical paper, oral interview, 2 learning reports, take home final exam. Assignments for 6222: 2 mid-length papers, participation in 3 seminars outside of class time.

AD students enrol in RGT6222HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 09:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Gilles Mongeau
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 24
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
RGT3333HS  L0101

Transformative Dynamics of Grace

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Explores the transformative dynamics of grace in Scripture, representative early theologians, early doctrinal development, medieval theology and the Reformation period. Participants develop a contemporary systematic approach, especially with respect to ecumenical and interfaith issues. Draws on the thought of Bernard Lonergan. Written assignments, readings, discussion.

AD students enrol in RGT6333HS.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Jeremy Wilkins
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 24
Enrollment Notes: Max 42 (AD & BD)
KNT3345HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/03/27

Theologies of Protestant Spirituality & Formation

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course will examine Protestant Theological Teaching and Traditions of Spirituality and Formation as rooted in medieval and reformation approaches with a particular reference to the Reformed Tradition. In the light of these traditions the course will challenge students to develop a credible and constructive theological framework for spirituality and formation in the 21st century North American and particularly Canadian context.

AD students enrol in KNT6345HS.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Charles James Fensham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SMT3370HS  L0101

Spirituality and Ecology: Integration and Implications

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course provides an exploration of how Christianity has understood the relationship among God, creation, humanity and spirituality, and how that understanding has contributed to the ecological challenges we currently face as well as can contribute to a helpful response. The course begins with an overview of our understanding of spirituality and creation during the patristic, medieval and reformation periods, then shifts to contemporary understandings drawing from current discussions of Christology, creation-centred spirituality, eco-feminism, deep ecology, and the healing of nature and the healing of self. Methods: Lectures, discussions. Evaluation: reflection paper, integration paper, class participation, practicum.

AD students enrol in SMT6370HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 17:00 to 19:00
Instructors: Dennis Patrick O'Hara
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 20 · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
RGT3436HS  L0101

Sacramental Theology

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Sacraments of baptism, confirmation, Eucharist, reconciliation, anointing of the sick, orders, and marriage as symbols of the world, challenge to human existence, life functions of the Church and features of Christology and revelation. Lectures, seminars, mid-term papers and final paper. Short paper on Symbol and Sacrament, total 20%; four short papers on one of the sacraments, 10% each (total 40%); three case study critiques for in-class discussion, total 10%; one final paper, total 30%.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Margaret Lavin
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 22
WYT3501HS  L0101

History of Early Modern European Christian Thought

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course surveys aspects of Christian thinking (not necessarily strictly theology) of the early modern period, concentrating on France, England, and representatives from other Western European countries. Lectures and readings focus on the question of (re)defining Christian identity, within several areas of religious concern: devotional life, epistemology, human history, and social relations. The course aims to provide students with first-hand knowledge of primary material that was either influential upon or typical of fundamental (though often conflictual) ways of construing Christian identity during this period and that have remained, in various guises, still a part of contemporary Christian outlooks. Course requirements include attendance at lectures and tutorials, the extensive assigned reading; 1-page weekly critical overviews, and the choice of a final exam or final paper.

AD students enrol in WYT6501HS.

Schedule: Monday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Ephraim Radner
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
CGT3521HS  L4101

Systematic Theology

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Waterloo Site

This course focuses on a major theological work by a significant author, and examines the coherence and interrelation of its themes This iteration will consist of a careful and close reading of one of the pivotal volumes of Karl Barth's Church Dogmatics, among the most significant works of theology in the 20th century. Volume II, part 2 is noted for its revolutionary relocation of the doctrine of election in the doctrine of God, for grounding Christian ethics in dogmatics, and for its consistent Christological centre. Within this framework, oriented by careful exegetical work, Barth treats themes such as Trinity, Israel, church, the destiny of the individual, and ethics as the command of God.

Schedule: Tuesday, 13:00 to 15:30
Instructors: Jeremy M. Bergen
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 4 · Max: 15
RGT3581HS  L0101

Hans Urs von Balthasar

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Inspiring and profound are terms often attributed to the theology of von Balthasar. Benedict XVI said of his work, "His theological reflection maintains intact, to this day, a profound timeliness and leads many to penetrate ever more into the profoundity of the mystery of faith". This course begins an exploration of his work. There is consideration of the Trilogy: Herrlichkeit, Theo-Drama and Theo-Logic; the influence of Ignatius Loyola and Adrienne von Speyr; and the place of Mary. Not a course for the faint-hearted, von Balthasar's work is at times dense and complex but the rewards are beyond price. Prerequisite: one year of theology, at least three theology courses. Lectures, seminar discussions, student presentations, one short paper and a research paper.

Schedule: Wednesday, 09:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Gill Goulding
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 22
Enrollment Notes: Max 22 (AD & BD)
EMT3604HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/12/17

Becoming Intercultural Communities

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will develop knowledge and practice skills for intercultural life and leadership in heterogeneous publics. We will draw on interdisciplinary, intercultural materials, including: critical social and cultural theories, formation of complex identities at intersections of structures of social markers; scriptural, theological and ethical attention to difference and similarity; worship and educational resources; and the case of the United Church of Canada project "Becoming an Intercultural Church" as a vision and practice to live out its commitment to racial and social justice. (Qualifies as a designated elective in theology or ethics.) Seminar format with instructional input, small groups, modest cross-cultural immersion project. Evaluation: a book review (30%); a class presentation (30%), and a final integrative project (40%). Prerequisites: basic course in bible and theology.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Marilyn J. Legge
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Enrollment Notes: This course will serve as a designated elective in Ethics or Church and Community under the MDiv program, and as a designated elective in Social Ethics under the MPS Social Service stream program.

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EMT3610HS  L0101

Religious Thought and Spirituality in Islam

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This is a historical and topical survey of the origins and development of Islamic religious practices and mysticism. The course is primarily concerned with the growth of mystical tradition in Islam, the rise of asceticism, the early forms of personal piety that culminated into emphasis over mystical dimensions of Islamic religious experience and practice. The course will examine the rise of Sufi orders, the systematization of Sufi teaching and the evolution of theosophical dimensions of mysticism, and finally, the contribution of Sufism in the Islamic arts and literatures. Lectures, readings and class discussions. Annotated bibliography 15%, oral presentations 25%, project (research paper) 35%, project presentation 10% and class participation 5%.

AD students enrol in EMT6610HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 17:00 to 19:00
Instructors: Nevin Reda
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

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CGT3621HS  L0101

Theologizing in the Anabaptist-Mennonite Tradition

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course is a survey of defining theological, ethical and spiritual writings in sixteenth century Anabaptism and its descendent movements, especially Mennonites. It offers an understanding of the religious and cultural forces that have shaped this tradition. It focuses especially on the flowering of North American Mennonite theology throughout the twentieth century and of global Mennonite theology after 1975. The course will proceed in a modified seminar format with an introductory lecture to each day's topic.

AD students enrol in CGT6621HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 09:00 to 11:00
Schedule Notes: This course will be taught at the TST Building, 47 Queen's Park Crescent East, Toronto.
Instructors: John D. Rempel
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SAT3643HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/08/05

Theology of Religions and Interfaith Dialogue

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course introduces the major religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam in detail and also others in brief) of the world -- their historical setting, basic principles, significant features, Holy Scriptures, theology, etc. -- and a Christian perspective on them with an urgency to enter into interfaith dialogue and peaceful coexistence.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Ephrem Nariculam
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
RGT3654HS  L0101

Healthcare Ethics in the Catholic Tradition

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This seminar (a combination of lecture, discussion, and case analysis format) will introduce principles and perspectives for biomedical ethics. The course is divided into two sections. The first part of the course will examine basic themes, principles, methodologies, and professional responsibilities in healthcare ethics. Special attention will be given to Catholic Church teaching and the Catholic tradition of moral reflection more generally, comparing and contrasting it with the currently dominant secular approach to bioethics. In the second section, we will examine particular ethical issues for healthcare ethics, employing the case analysis method. We will seek to bring to bear our earlier ethics and theological explorations as well as practical wisdom in our evaluations of these cases. Students will present analysis of particular problems, and others will respond to their analysis.

AD students enrol in RGT6654HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 13:00 to 15:30
Instructors: John Berkman
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 24
Enrollment Notes: (16 total AD & BD)
RGT3655HS  L0101

Ethics, Animals, and Christian Theology

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

In the last forty years ethical issues aroundthe care and treatment of non-huma animals has steadily grown as a concern in theology. While for much of this time it was considered at best a "marginal" issue, it is now one of the major concerns in environmental ethics. This course will examine the major figures in the development of "animal theology" in Protestant and Catholic theology. It will also look back to Christian Scripture and classical figures in the Christian tradition, and raise questions as to whether, and if so to what extent, the development of "animal theology" is either a departure from Christian tradition and/or a development within it. Issues in the course will include issues such as intensive agriculture (factory farming), the genetic modificiation of animals, zoos, pet, vegetarianism and veganism, and a variety of other issues that arise from human interaction with or concern for the well-being of non-human animals.

AD students enrol in RGT6655HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:30
Instructors: John Berkman
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 42
Enrollment Notes: Max 42 (AD & BD) 
SMT3670HS  L0101

Vatican II: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A study of the documents of the Second Vatican Council (1962)-1965) and their contemporary significance for students of ministry. Emphasis is on the historical context, the central theological content of each of the texts, and their relevance to professional ministry today. The course will consist of: weekly readings, seminar presentation on each of the documents, and focused in-class discussion,. Students will be evaluated on class participation as well as three smaller assignments; a background; an in-depth; and a pastoral, integrative final assignment, all of which are intended to assist students in exploring more deeply their own interest in the Council.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Michael Attridge
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Historical
WYT3682HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/10/21

Human Sexuality in a Christian Perspective

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will examine human sexuality from a range of theological and historical perspectives: scriptural, doctrinal, sociological, and ethical. Questions of sexual differentiation, desire, procreation, family, and marriage and celibacy will be discussed. The goal of the course is to provide the student with a broad base from which to discern a consistent pattern of Christian understanding regarding sexuality, within both historical and contemporary diversities. The course will engage broad reading, lecture, and discussion, with a final paper aimed at outlining and justifying a teaching syllabus for teenagers within a church setting (15 pages). Advanced Degree students will have an expanded reading list and will be writing a longer research paper on a chosen set topic relating to Christian formation with regard to sexuality within pluralistic cultures.

AD students enrol in WYT6682HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Ephraim Radner, Annette Brownlee
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
ICT3736HS  L0101

Birthpangs of the New Creation: Judgment unto Salvation In the Book of Revelation

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

In our culture, "apocalypse" typically refers to a cataclysmic, catastrophic ending, real or imagined. Often this meaning, in which fear eclipses hope, is traced back to the biblical tradition. But what if the book from which we derive the term, i.e. the "Apocalypse"-or "Revelation"-of John, refers less to the end of the world than to a transition between the two Ages? What if that transition is characterized as double-edged: as both 'the death throes of the old world order' and 'the birthpangs of the new creation'?

Attentive to the nature of apocalyptic discourse, this course will seek to develop a key area of systematic theology by exploring the topics of death, judgment, heaven, and hell-the 'four last things' of traditional eschatology-as they are portrayed in the book of Revelation. In allowing lntertexual and intratextual webs of meaning to emerge, we will pay special attention to the way in which Old Testament echoes, together with the book's own symbolic coherence and narrative logic, can open up new avenues for exegesis, and for theological reflection.

The topic of Final Judgment will be a special focus. How is this to be conceived in the light of the apocalyptic transition? If the first reference to Babylon in the biblicaJ canon, the Babel narrative of Gen 11 , refers to a judgment that does not bring history to an end but opens It up once again to the dissemination motif of Gen 1 :28, is it possible to detect a parallel 'judgment unto salvation' theme in the final book of the New Testament?

Our discussions will explore the interface between biblical studies, the "theological Interpretation of Scripture," and contemporary eschatology. Familiarity with New Testament Greek is an advantage but is not a prerequisite.

AD students enrol in ICT6736HS.

Schedule: Friday, 9:30 to 12:30
Instructors: Nicholas Ansell
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 3 · Max: 15
RGT3745HS  L0101

Issues in the Philosophy of Religion and The Brothers Karamazov

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course explores issues in the philosophy of religion, with special reference to The Brothers Karamazov. Major themes include: the existence and nature of God, religious language, religious experience, faith and reason, the problem of evil, religion and morality, and afterlife beliefs. Readings include Fyodor Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov and selections from theologians and philosophers of religion. Lectures, discussion, participation, and critical reflection papers.

AD students enrol in RGT6745HS.

Schedule: Monday, 18:30 to 20:30
Instructors: Michael Stoeber
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 12
Enrollment Notes: Max 12 (AD & BD)
ICT3751HS  L0101

The Radical Theopoetics of John D. Caputo

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This seminar will trace, explore, and interact with the developing Theopoetics of postmodern philosopher/theologian John D. Caputo. Situated at the interface between deconstruction and the religion, Theopoetics is a radical alternative to both classical theism and classical atheism, insisting that whether or not God shows up depends on us. In the style of Deconstruction, Theopoetics seeks a way between absolutism and relativism, envisioning Truth, not as a claim we make, but as a claim made on us. For Caputo, philosophy (as the search for wisdom) and theology (as the search for God) work together: The one true philosophy- the love of truth - is the love of God.

AD students enrol in ICT6751HS.

Schedule: Wednesday, 18:00 to 21:00
Instructors: James Olthuis
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 3 · Max: 15
WYT3805HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/08/05

Postmodernity and a Christian Worldview

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Postmodernity as a cultural phenomenon, implications in various areas of cultural endeavour (including politics, philosophy, psychology, theology, the arts, and science), and work toward an integral Christian worldview that gives guidance in a post-modern world. A particular concern will be to plumb the resources of Scripture for such a cultural context. Teaching method: seminars, lectures, multimedia. Evaluation is based upon essays (one 5-7 page essay, one 15-20 page essay)and participation.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Brian Walsh
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SAT3926HS  L0101

Social Justice

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2014 · St. Augustine's (2661 Kingston Rd.) Scarborough Site

Exploration in historical perspective of major themes in the Catholic Church's social doctrine by reading of magisterial documents in seminars. Relationship of ecclesiology and justice issues, and to crisis in contemporary Catholic social thought. Essay, participation, final exam.

Schedule: Saturday, 09:00 to 15:30
Schedule Notes: January 24th, February 7th, March 7th and March 28th
Instructors: Thomas Lynch
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8
SAT3932HS  L0101

Human Sexuality and Marriage

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A study of the basis of sexuality and marriage and select related issues in light of the Catholic moral tradition. Readings, lectures, discussions, paper, mid-term test, final exam; the course will also include a limited online component. (Prerequisite: Fundamental Christian Ethics I and II or Permission of Instructor)

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Patricia Murphy
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 16
5000 Level Courses
WYT5410HS  L0101

The Church Evangelical and Catholic

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course explores a range of proposals in contemporary ecclesiology across the ecumenical spectrum. Special attention will be given to questions surrounding the Church's concretely historical character, as in the ecclesiology of "practices" and its critics. Authors read may include Ratzinger, Jenson, Hauerwas, Cavanaugh, Radner and Healy. Seminar discussion; brief, bullet-point responses to the readings; 2500-word final paper.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Joseph Mangina
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRT5555HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/08/11

Fredrick Denison Maurice & Victorian Christianity

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A study of the life and writings of F.D. Maurice in relation to the church and society of his time. Topics will include doctrine of sacrifice, place of the Bible in church life, Christian ethics, Christian socialism, and Anglican self-understanding. After six classes of lectures and class discussions, students will present a seminar on a selected book by Maurice. Term paper.

Schedule: Thursday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 340
RGT5556HS  L0101

Seminar: Understanding Aquinas on his own Terms

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This is a seminar in practical exegesis of the Thomistic writings. We will review: questions of historiography and historical context; medieval theory of language, including the practices of grammar, dialectic and rhetoric; pedagogical practices of the university; Aquinas' use of philosophical tools for understanding (Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics); key principles of theological method according to Aquinas (science, contemplation, wisdom); kinds of writings and their responsible exegesis. The seminar meets for three hours a week, and relies heavily on in-class exercises. In addition to students preparing for the disciplined theological or historical study of Aquinas, this seminar will be of interest to any student seeking to develop those skills that assist in the understanding of the great ancient and medieval classics of theology.

Schedule: Monday, 9:00 to 12:00
Instructors: Gilles Mongeau
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 16 · Crosslisted to: Historical
WYT5565HS  L0101

Introduction to the Theology of Karl Barth

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Following the outline of Eberhard Busch`s book, The Great Passion, on Barth`s theology, questions will be raised for discussion about Barth`s treatment of the knowledge of God, Israel, God`s triunity, religion, creation, reconcilliation, ethics, church, time.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: David Demson
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT5578HS  L0101

Lonergan's Method in Theology

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course introduces five aspects of advanced theological research through a critical reading of Bernard Lonergan's Method in Theology. Lonergan's methodological approach is exemplified and complemented by rhetorical analysis, genetic analysis, source reading, clarification by contrast and systematic reasoning. Readings, bulletin board participation, critical book review, seminar, major paper.

Schedule: Monday, 16:30 to 18:30
Instructors: John Dadosky
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 22
TRT5579HS  L0101

Kierkegaard's Studies

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Central ideas in the Kierkegaard corpus and their relevance to contemporary theological and philosophical concerns. Introductory lecture, seminar discussion of readings, discussions, one major term paper.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Abrahim H. Khan
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 341
KNT5651HS  L0101

Ecumenical Missional Ecclesiology

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will examine the development of Ecumenical Missional Ecclesiology in the 20th and 21st century with a focus on the dimensions of missional ecclesiology for the North American context. The course will explore the theological origins of ecumenical missional ecclesiology, the biblical and hermeneutical dimension of such theology, the present context and its relationship to such ecclesiology and the direction of ecumenical missional ecclesiology. Evaluation: Seminars, papers. Prerequisite: AD program enrolment.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Charles James Fensham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
ICT5764HS  L0101

"To The Unknown God": Paul and Some Philosophers

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course explores the current fascination with the writings of Paul among non-Christian thinkers engaged in the study of political theology.

Schedule: Thursday, 13:30 to 16:30
Instructors: Ronald Kuipers
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 3 · Max: 15
EMT5912HS  L0101

Theological Method

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course provides a critical study of resources and challenges for advanced work in theology and ethics. The contribution, critique, and challenge of contextual, constructive, liberative, feminist, postcolonial, womanist theologies to each other and to Western theological methodology will be examined. This approach to the study of theological method will give specific attention to how the recovery and use of non-traditional sources of God-talk and moral life (prayers, songs, story, etc.) are creating new theological paradigms. How traditiona1 sources of theology (scripture, tradition, reason and experience) are interpreted, through the lens of different cultures and contexts of oppression and social relations of domination and subordination, will also be explored. It investigates how methods matter for the formation and adjudication of Christian theology, practices and moral agency in specific global and local contexts. Emphasis on self-reflexive, dialogical and collaborative skills in research and scholarship.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Marilyn J. Legge
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: This course was previously taught under the title 'Method in Theological Ethics'

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TRT5948HF  L0101

Critical Theory of Religion from a Psychoanalytic Perspective

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Inquiry into the role and meaning of religion in a post/metaphysical, post/secular time within the frameworks of critical theory, psychoanalysis and ethics. Authors include Horkheimer, Adorno, Benjamin, Freud, Habermas and their theological/religious interlocutors, i.e. Charles Davis, Elisabeth Schuessler Fiorenza, Hent de Vries. Major paper.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Marsha A. Hewitt
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 213
6000 Level Courses
RGT6222HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/07/21

God, One and Triune

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Close textual study of the Scriptural sources and dogmatic development of the Church's reflection on the identity of the God who is revealed in Jesus the Christ. Students develop a systematic understanding of this material, leading to a personal and critical appropriation of the tradition in light of preparation for pastoral and theological leadership in the Church. Lectures and seminars. Assignments for 3222: exegetical paper, oral interview, 2 learning reports, take home final exam. Assignments for 6222: 2 mid-length papers, participation in 3 seminars outside of class time.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3222HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 09:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Gilles Mongeau
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 24
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
RGT6333HS  L0101

Transformative Dynamics of Grace

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Explores the transformative dynamics of grace in Scripture, representative early theologians, early doctrinal development, medieval theology and the Reformation period. Participants develop a contemporary systematic approach, especially with respect to ecumenical and interfaith issues. Draws on the thought of Bernard Lonergan. Written assignments, readings, discussion.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3333HS.

Schedule: Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Jeremy Wilkins
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 24
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
KNT6345HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/03/27

Theologies of Protestant Spirituality & Formation

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course will examine Protestant Theological Teaching and Traditions of Spirituality and Formation as rooted in medieval and reformation approaches with a particular reference to the Reformed Tradition. In the light of these traditions the course will challenge students to develop a credible and constructive theological framework for spirituality and formation in the 21st century North American and particularly Canadian context.

Basic Degree students enrol in KNT3345HS.

Schedule: Wednesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Charles James Fensham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SMT6370HS  L0101

Spirituality and Ecology: Integration and Implications

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course provides an exploration of how Christianity has understood the relationship among God, creation, humanity and spirituality, and how that understanding has contributed to the ecological challenges we currently face as well as can contribute to a helpful response. The course begins with an overview of our understanding of spirituality and creation during the patristic, medieval and reformation periods, then shifts to contemporary understandings drawing from current discussions of Christology, creation-centred spirituality, eco-feminism, deep ecology, and the healing of nature and the healing of self. Methods: Lectures, discussions. Evaluation: reflection paper, integration paper, class participation, practicum.

Basic Degree students enrol in SMT3370HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 17:00 to 19:00
Instructors: Dennis Patrick O'Hara
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 20 · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
WYT6501HS  L0101

History of Early Modern European Christian Thought

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course surveys aspects of Christian thinking (not necessarily strictly theology) of the early modern period, concentrating on France, England, and representatives from other Western European countries. Lectures and readings focus on the question of (re)defining Christian identity, within several areas of religious concern: devotional life, epistemology, human history, and social relations. The course aims to provide students with first-hand knowledge of primary material that was either influential upon or typical of fundamental (though often conflictual) ways of construing Christian identity during this period and that have remained, in various guises, still a part of contemporary Christian outlooks. Course requirements include attendance at lectures and tutorials, the extensive assigned reading; 1-page weekly critical overviews, and the choice of a final exam or final paper.

Basic Degree students enrol in WYT3501HS.

Schedule: Monday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Ephraim Radner
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT6581HS  L0101

Hans Urs von Balthasar

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Inspiring and profound are terms often attributed to the theology of von Balthasar. Benedict XVI said of his work, "His theological reflection maintains intact, to this day, a profound timeliness and leads many to penetrate ever more into the profoundity of the mystery of faith". This course begins an exploration of his work. There is consideration of the Trilogy: Herrlichkeit, Theo-Drama and Theo-Logic; the influence of Ignatius Loyola and Adrienne von Speyr; and the place of Mary. Not a course for the faint-hearted, von Balthasar's work is at times dense and complex but the rewards are beyond price. Prerequisite: one year of theology, at least three theology courses. Lectures, seminar discussions, student presentations, one short paper and a research paper.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3581HS.

Schedule: Wednesday, 09:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Gill Goulding
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 22
Enrollment Notes: Max 22 (AD & BD)
EMT6610HS  L0101

Religious Thought and Spirituality in Islam

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This is a historical and topical survey of the origins and development of Islamic religious practices and mysticism. The course is primarily concerned with the growth of mystical tradition in Islam, the rise of asceticism, the early forms of personal piety that culminated into emphasis over mystical dimensions of Islamic religious experience and practice. The course will examine the rise of Sufi orders, the systematization of Sufi teaching and the evolution of theosophical dimensions of mysticism, and finally, the contribution of Sufism in the Islamic arts and literatures. Lectures, readings and class discussions. Annotated bibliography 15%, oral presentations 25%, project (research paper) 35%, project presentation 10% and class participation 5%.

Basic Degree students enrol in EMT3610HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 17:00 to 19:00
Instructors: Nevin Reda
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

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CGT6621HS  L0101

Theologizing in the Anabaptist-Mennonite Tradition

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course is a survey of defining theological, ethical and spiritual writings in sixteenth century Anabaptism and its descendent movements, especially Mennonites. It offers an understanding of the religious and cultural forces that have shaped this tradition. It focuses especially on the flowering of North American Mennonite theology throughout the twentieth century and of global Mennonite theology after 1975. The course will proceed in a modified seminar format with an introductory lecture to each day's topic.

Basic Degree students enrol in CGT3621HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 09:00 to 11:00
Schedule Notes: This course will be taught at the TST Building, 47 Queen's Park Crescent East. Toronto
Instructors: John D. Rempel
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT6654HS  L0101

Healthcare Ethics in the Catholic Tradition

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This seminar (a combination of lecture, discussion, and case analysis format) will introduce principles and perspectives for biomedical ethics. The course is divided into two sections. The first part of the course will examine basic themes, principles, methodologies, and professional responsibilities in healthcare ethics. Special attention will be given to Catholic Church teaching and the Catholic tradition of moral reflection more generally, comparing and contrasting it with the currently dominant secular approach to bioethics. In the second section, we will examine particular ethical issues for healthcare ethics, employing the case analysis method. We will seek to bring to bear our earlier ethics and theological explorations as well as practical wisdom in our evaluations of these cases. Students will present analysis of particular problems, and others will respond to their analysis.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3654HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 13:00 to 15:30
Instructors: John Berkman
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 24
Enrollment Notes: (16 total AD & BD)
RGT6655HS  L0101

Ethics, Animals, and Christian Theology

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

In the last forty years ethical issues aroundthe care and treatment of non-huma animals has steadily grown as a concern in theology. While for much of this time it was considered at best a "marginal" issue, it is now one of the major concerns in environmental ethics. This course will examine the major figures in the development of "animal theology" in Protestant and Catholic theology. It will also look back to Christian Scripture and classical figures in the Christian tradition, and raise questions as to whether, and if so to what extent, the development of "animal theology" is either a departure from Christian tradition and/or a development within it. Issues in the course will include issues such as intensive agriculture (factory farming), the genetic modificiation of animals, zoos, pet, vegetarianism and veganism, and a variety of other issues that arise from human interaction with or concern for the well-being of non-human animals.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3655HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:30
Instructors: John Berkman
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 42
Enrollment Notes: Max 42 (AD & BD) 
WYT6682HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2010/10/21

Human Sexuality in a Christian Perspective

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will examine human sexuality from a range of theological and historical perspectives: scriptural, doctrinal, sociological, and ethical. Questions of sexual differentiation, desire, procreation, family, and marriage and celibacy will be discussed. The goal of the course is to provide the student with a broad base from which to discern a consistent pattern of Christian understanding regarding sexuality, within both historical and contemporary diversities. The course will engage broad reading, lecture, and discussion, with a final paper aimed at outlining and justifying a teaching syllabus for teenagers within a church setting (15 pages). Advanced Degree students will have an expanded reading list and will be writing a longer research paper on a chosen set topic relating to Christian formation with regard to sexuality within pluralistic cultures.

Basic Degree students enrol in WYT3682HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Ephraim Radner, Annette Brownlee
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
ICT6736HS  L0101

Birthpangs of the New Creation: Judgment unto Salvation In the Book of Revelation

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

In our culture, "apocalypse" typically refers to a cataclysmic, catastrophic ending, real or imagined. Often this meaning, in which fear eclipses hope, is traced back to the biblical tradition. But what if the book from which we derive the term, i.e. the "Apocalypse"-or "Revelation"-of John, refers less to the end of the world than to a transition between the two Ages? What if that transition is characterized as double-edged: as both 'the death throes of the old world order' and 'the birthpangs of the new creation'? Attentive to the nature of apocalyptic discourse, this course will seek to develop a key area of systematic theology by exploring the topics of death, judgment, heaven, and hell-the 'four last things' of traditional eschatology-as they are portrayed in the book of Revelation. In allowing lntertexual and intratextual webs of meaning to emerge, we will pay special attention to the way in which Old Testament echoes, together with the book's own symbolic coherence and narrative logic, can open up new avenues for exegesis, and for theological reflection. The topic of Final Judgment will be a special focus. How is this to be conceived in the light of the apocalyptic transition? If the first reference to Babylon in the biblicaJ canon, the Babel narrative of Gen 11 , refers to a judgment that does not bring history to an end but opens It up once again to the dissemination motif of Gen 1 :28, is it possible to detect a parallel 'judgment unto salvation' theme in the final book of the New Testament? Our discussions will explore the interface between biblical studies, the "theological Interpretation of Scripture," and contemporary eschatology. Familiarity with New Testament Greek is an advantage but is not a prerequisite.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICT3736HS.

Schedule: Friday, 09:30 to 12:30
Instructors: Nicholas Ansell
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT6745HS  L0101

Issues in the Philosophy of Religion and The Brothers Karamazov

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course explores issues in the philosophy of religion, with special reference to The Brothers Karamazov. Major themes include: the existence and nature of God, religious language, religious experience, faith and reason, the problem of evil, religion and morality, and afterlife beliefs. Readings include Fyodor Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov and selections from theologians and philosophers of religion. Lectures, discussion, participation, and critical reflection papers.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3745HS.

Schedule: Monday, 18:30 to 20:30
Instructors: Michael Stoeber
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 12
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
ICT6751HS  L0101

The Radical Theopoetics of John D. Caputo

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This seminar will trace, explore, and interact with the developing Theopoetics of postmodern philosopher/theologian John D. Caputo. Situated at the interface between deconstruction and the religion, Theopoetics is a radical alternative to both classical theism and classical atheism, insisting that whether or not God shows up depends on us. In the style of Deconstruction, Theopoetics seeks a way between absolutism and relativism, envisioning Truth, not as a claim we make, but as a claim made on us. For Caputo, philosophy (as the search for wisdom) and theology (as the search for God) work together: The one true philosophy- the love of truth - is the love of God.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICT3751HS.

Schedule: Wednesday, 18:00 to 21:00
Instructors: James Olthuis
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 3 · Max: 15
Biblical Crosslisted Courses
WYB2105HS  L4101

Theological Exegesis for Preaching

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Canada - other Site

This course Is an Introduction to theolog ically disciplined biblical preaching. We will examine the fourfold sense of scripture and Trinitarian and.Chrlstologlcal readings of scriptural texts. Students will be Introduced to the lectionary, its origins and its importance. This course will also cover the exegetical presuppositions and rhetorical styles of great preachers throughout the history of the Church. The course intends to train students to work theologically wtth scripture and to create robust sermon outlines and full sermon texts. Students will learn to use a variety of resources for preaching. Students will also engage ancient and medieval traditions of reading scripture, and understand their relevance and Importance in preaching. Finally, students will also be exposed to the rhetorical elements of preaching. Finally, students will also be exposed to the rhetorical elements of preaching and be challenged to incorporate these skills in their own work as preachers.

Schedule: Irregular · Begins: · Ends:
Schedule Notes: Tuesday, Thursday and weekend intensive 18:00 to 21:00
Instructors: TBA, David Widdicombe
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 20 · Crosslisted to: Theological, Pastoral Theology
Additional Notes: Course offered in Winnipeg. For registration please contact the Wycliffe Registrar's Office 
Historical Crosslisted Courses
WYH2244HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/12/01

Revolution, Prophecy, and Millennialism, 1789-1850

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Traces the role of prophecy and millennialism In the context of radical political and social change in Britain and Ireland in the period 1789-1850. Considers the impact of the American and French revolutions, and the Romantic movement in inducing a revival of millennialism in the early 19th century. Examines millennial beliefs and how they impacted broader political, social, and ecclesiastical contexts.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Thomas P. Power
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 10 · Crosslisted to: Theological
Additional Notes: This course would fulfil the history elective requirement within the M.Div. program.
SMH5285HS  L0101

Russian Theologians

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Historical context and enduring influence of key theologians during the Silver Age of Russian culture: Vladimir Soloviev, Sergei Bulgakov, Pavel Florensky. Reading and analysis of representative works. Seminar, major essay. Lectures, seminars and discussion of texts.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: T. Allan Smith
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
Interdisciplinary Crosslisted Courses
SMJ3609HS  L0101

Catholic Social Teaching

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course traces the development of Catholic Social Teaching and action from an historical and theological perspective. A Christian concept of justice will be explored within Biblical and theological contexts. Cultural developments that have impacted, and those that continue to influence, social thought, teaching and action within the Church will be discussed. The primary texts for the course are the social documents of the Church beginning with the Encyclical of Pope Leo XIII, Rerum Novarum (1891) and continuing to the present day. Students will become familiar with the content of such documents and they will be encouraged to analyse the theological and social foundations upon which the documents have been developed. Key principles of Catholic Social Teaching will be introduced. The course will also explore the Christian call to justice and ways in which the social teachings of the Church can be integrated into personal spirituality and ministry. To facilitate such integration, examples will be highlighted from the lives of social activists within the Church. Teaching and learning methods will include, lecture, discussion, media and biographical analysis.

Schedule: Tuesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Mary Rowell
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological, Pastoral Theology
Enrollment Notes: This is an inter-disciplinary course that is cross-listed to the Historical, Pastoral Theological and Theological Departments.
Pastoral Theology Crosslisted Courses
RGP3207HS  L0101

Spirituality and Suffering

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A critical exploration of religious responses to suffering. Focal issues will include the relation of love and spiritual transformation to suffering, the role of religious models or exemplars of suffering, and religious experience and the problems of theodicy. Readings will include works by Fyodor Dostoevsky, Dorothee Soelle and Simone Weil, as well as other selections drawn from the Christian, Buddhist, and Jewish traditions. Lectures, discussion, critical reflection papers.

AD students enrol in RGP6207HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Michael Stoeber
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 24 · Crosslisted to: Theological
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
RGP6207HS  L0101

Spirituality and Suffering

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A critical exploration of religious responses to suffering. Focal issues will include the relation of love and spiritual transformation to suffering, the role of religious models or exemplars of suffering, and religious experience and the problems of theodicy. Readings will include works by Fyodor Dostoevsky, Dorothee Soelle and Simone Weil, as well as other selections drawn from the Christian, Buddhist, and Jewish traditions. Lectures, discussion, critical reflection papers.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGP3207HS.

Schedule: Thursday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Michael Stoeber
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 24 · Crosslisted to: Theological
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)

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