Course Timetable for Tuesday: Winter of 2015

Morning Courses

14;00 to 16:00

WYF3010HS  L0101

Theological Integration Seminar

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course is based on the theological conviction that knowing the Triune God is inseparable from participating in a particular community and its practices participation which is the work of God's Holy Spirit. We will examine the purpose of congregational life in light of our own discipleship and calls to leadership in ministry. We will examine the purpose of building up congregations, discipleship making, worship, pastoral care and the pastoral offices of baptism (adult & children), weddings, and funerals. Short lectures, class discussion. Grading is based on class participation, short assignments, quizzes and a final paper. Students take this course in conjunction with their field education placement.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14;00 to 16:00
Instructors: Annette Brownlee
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

9:00 to 11:00

EMP5325HS  L0101

Rhetoric and Poetics for Preaching

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Literature in classical and contemporary rhetoric and poetics with a view to more imaginative preaching. Lectures, seminars, essay, sermons, class presentation.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Paul Scott Wilson
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

09:00 to 11:00

RGT6222HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/07/21

God, One and Triune

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Close textual study of the Scriptural sources and dogmatic development of the Church's reflection on the identity of the God who is revealed in Jesus the Christ. Students develop a systematic understanding of this material, leading to a personal and critical appropriation of the tradition in light of preparation for pastoral and theological leadership in the Church. Lectures and seminars. Assignments for 3222: exegetical paper, oral interview, 2 learning reports, take home final exam. Assignments for 6222: 2 mid-length papers, participation in 3 seminars outside of class time.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3222HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 09:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Gilles Mongeau
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 24
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
RGT3222HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2012/07/21

God, One and Triune

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Close textual study of the Scriptural sources and dogmatic development of the Church's reflection on the identity of the God who is revealed in Jesus the Christ. Students develop a systematic understanding of this material, leading to a personal and critical appropriation of the tradition in light of preparation for pastoral and theological leadership in the Church. Lectures and seminars. Assignments for 3222: exegetical paper, oral interview, 2 learning reports, take home final exam. Assignments for 6222: 2 mid-length papers, participation in 3 seminars outside of class time.

AD students enrol in RGT6222HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 09:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Gilles Mongeau
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 24
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)

9:00 to 11:00

TRB3721HS  L0101

The Passion Narratives

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course will study the passion narratives of the synoptic gospels, John and the extra-canonical gospels. It will examine the question of a premarkan passion narrative, compositional theories and the influence of the Old Testament on the traditions of the passion and death of Jesus.

AD students enrol in TRB6721HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Michael Steinhauser
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 213
KNB1501HS  L0101

Understanding the New Testament

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Exploration of the content of New Testament writings, especially the canonical gospels and Pauline corpus. Emphasis will be placed upon understanding these writings in their original socio-historical contexts, and on methods of interpretation.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Bradley McLean
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
WYB2501HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/05/29

Interpreting the New Testament in the Community of Faith

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A study of the tools and methods involved in the process of New Testament interpretation, with special attention to the context and needs of the church. Consideration will be given to contemporary hermeneutical discussion, to a full range of contemporary exegetical methods, and to the nature and function of the NT as scripture, all in conjunction with a thorough and practical examination of a particular NT text. Lectures and seminars, readings, seminar papers and a final paper or project.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Terence L. Donaldson
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Course replaced with Salvation as Liberation in paul WYB3714/6714 approved by Biblical Department
SAB2677HS  L0101

Johannine Literature

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Introduction to the gospel and letters of John concerning authorship, unity, historicity and the situation of the Johannine church. Exploration of basic themes in this tradition and what they reveal about the life of Jesus and believing in him. Exegesis of selected passages from the Gospel and 1 John. Lectures, discussions, midterm exam, paper, final exam. Prerequisite: An Introduction to New Testament course.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Walter Werbylo
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 30

09:00 to 11:00

RGT2726HS  L0101

Revolutions in 19th-Century European Thought

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The 19th century was a time of great political and intellectual ferment. In particular, it was the century in which Europeans came to develop a keen sense of historical consciousness. Come find out how Hegel, Kierkegaard, Marx, Darwin, Nietzsche and Freud forever changed the way we look at the world. Themes to be considered include history, human nature, morality, religion and God. We will also focus on the problem of how the different academic disciplines are related to one another.

We will consider each thinker's ideas in their historical context and in light of their implications for contemporary culture and for our own thinking.

Schedule: Tuesday, 09:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Sean Mulrooney
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

9:00 to 11:00

TRB6721HS  L0101

The Passion Narratives

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course will study the passion narratives of the synoptic gospels, John and the extra-canonical gospels. It will examine the question of a premarkan passion narrative, compositional theories and the influence of the Old Testament on the traditions of the passion and death of Jesus.

Basic Degree students enrol in TRB3721HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Michael Steinhauser
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 213
KNP6372HS  L0101

Preaching Practicum: 1 Corinthians

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course focuses on a pastoral interpretation of 1 Corinthians and how this letter may be proclaimed in the life of the church today. Through an investigation of letter structure, a social cultural reading, congregational studies, and homiletical theory this course will seek to elucidate the possibilities of Paul's letter for preaching today. Prerequisites: Introductory courses in both preaching and New Testament.

Basic Degree students enrol in KNP3372HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Dorcas Gordon
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
KNP3372HS  L0101

Preaching Practicum: 1 Corinthians

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course focuses on a pastoral interpretation of 1 Corinthians and how this letter may be proclaimed in the life of the church today. Through an investigation of letter structure, a social cultural reading, congregational studies, and homiletical theory this course will seek to elucidate the possibilities of Paul's letter for preaching today. Prerequisites: Introductory courses in both preaching and New Testament.

AD students enrol in KNP6372HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Dorcas Gordon
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

09:00 to 11:00

WYB3714HS  L0101

Salvation as Liberation in Paul

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A significant reappraisal of Paul's theology is currently underway, involving not only particular aspects (e.g. justification by faith, atonement) and overall structure, but also the more basic question of how we might speak of Paul as a theological thinker. This course will study major theological themes in Paul's letters - including the nature of human existence; sin; the law; the death and resurrection of Christ; life "in Christ"; Israel and the Gentiles - with special emphasis on salvation as liberation (from "the powers" to the new solidarity of life "in Christ"). Three short resumes, final paper.

AD students enrol in WYB6714HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 09:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Terence L. Donaldson
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

9:00 to 11:00

WYH2244HS  L0101

Revolution, Prophecy, and Millennialism, 1789-1850

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Traces the role of prophecy and millennialism In the context of radical political and social change in Britain and Ireland in the period 1789-1850. Considers the impact of the American and French revolutions, and the Romantic movement in inducing a revival of millennialism in the early 19th century. Examines millennial beliefs and how they impacted broader political, social, and ecclesiastical contexts.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Thomas P. Power
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 10 · Crosslisted to: Theological
Additional Notes: This course would fulfil the history elective requirement within the M.Div. program.
SAT3643HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/08/05

Theology of Religions and Interfaith Dialogue

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course introduces the major religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity and Islam in detail and also others in brief) of the world -- their historical setting, basic principles, significant features, Holy Scriptures, theology, etc. -- and a Christian perspective on them with an urgency to enter into interfaith dialogue and peaceful coexistence.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Ephrem Nariculam
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Pastoral Theology
TRT1101HS  L0101

Systematic Theology

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Offers an overview of the principles, resources, and central themes of Christian theology - revelation, the doctrines of the Trinity, the person and work of Jesus Christ, and humanity in relation to God. Discussion paper, final exam, class participation.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: David Neelands
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 341

09:00 to 11:00

WYB6714HS  L0101

Salvation as Liberation in Paul

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A significant reappraisal of Paul's theology is currently underway, involving not only particular aspects (e.g. justification by faith, atonement) and overall structure, but also the more basic question of how we might speak of Paul as a theological thinker. This course will study major theological themes in Paul's letters - including the nature of human existence; sin; the law; the death and resurrection of Christ; life "in Christ"; Israel and the Gentiles - with special emphasis on salvation as liberation (from "the powers" to the new solidarity of life "in Christ"). Three short resumes, final paper.

Basic Degree students enrol in WYB3714HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 09:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Terence L. Donaldson
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

09:00 to 12:00

TSJ5022HS  L0101

Area Studies and Course Design

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

We all leave doctoral studies as experts in our fields and walk into classrooms full of non-expert students. What now? This course addresses the relationship between subject knowledge and teaching. Topics include issues related to course design and delivery (e.g., syllabus construction, assignments, development of outcomes & objectives) as well as to broader pedagogical issues (e.g., education for [trans]formation, relationships between classroom and context, professional identity). Students will produce a full introductory-level course syllabus and accompanying essay, session notes, example lecture in collaboration with a faculty supervisor. Weekly readings, discussion, and practical assignments. 

Schedule: Tuesday, 09:00 to 12:00
Schedule Notes: This course will take place at St. Michael's College.
Instructors: Colleen Shantz
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 25
Enrollment Notes: Enrolment restricted to entering ThD students registered in their first semester of studies in Sept. 2014.

9:00 to 12:00

EMB1506HS  L0101

New Testament II

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Introduction to the literary structure, rhetorical argument, and certain social issues from Romans to Revelation. Emphasis is placed on acquiring familiarity with the texts and ability to converse critically about the particular problems that these texts both seek to solve and have created. Readings, small group discussion, short papers.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 12:00
Instructors: Leif Vaage
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

9:00 to 13:00

WYT2505HS  L0101

Introduction to Anglican Theology: Ways of Reading the Bible in the English Church and Anglican Communion

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This is a survey course in Anglican theology that will involve extensive reading. Using the lens of Scriptural interpretation as a way of approaching the sweep of Anglican theological thinking, this course will survey chronologically a broad range Anglican readers of Scripture in an attempt to gauge the development of the larger religious vision of Anglicanism over time. Beginning with Wycliffe, the course will move through a number of writers into the early 20th century, and end with some recent statements on the reading of Scripture from around the Anglican Communion. Lectures and weekly tutorials on the primary-source readings. Weekly content quizzes; midterm; final exam.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:00 to 13:00
Schedule Notes: two 90 min sessions 9:00 to 10:30 then 11:30 to 13:00 with 1 hr break
Instructors: Ephraim Radner
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Enrollment Notes: This course is a required course for all Anglican M.Div. students, normally completed in the second year (or equivalent) of the program and an elective choice for all basic degree students. It is also a required course within the Cetificate of Anglican Studies program.

09:00 to 15:00

RGT2810HS  L0101

Pastoral Competency

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A review of the moral, pastoral and canonical principles of sound ministerial practice in the Roman Catholic tradition, along with an intensive practicum. Online component, lecture, discussion, tutoring. For lay students and ordination candidates in the M.Div. program at Regis College only. Oral Examination for pass/fail credit. Prerequisite: permission of the Regis College M.Div. Director.

 

Schedule: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, 09:00 to 15:00 · Begins: 04/13 · Ends: 04/21
Instructors: Gilles Mongeau
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 12

9:30 to 12:30

ICH6761HS  L0101

Reconsidering Kant's Aesthetics

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Until recently, it was customary to regard Kant as the thinker who gave definitive form to the notion of aesthetic judgment and who succeeded in explaining why aesthetic experience is something essentially distinct from other kinds of experience. The postmodern rejection of the practice of aesthetic theory, however, has done much to undermine Kant's position vis-a-vis the arts. This course aims to re-examine Kant's aesthetic theory from the vantage point of the art theoretical literature that preceded it. In an effort to better understand Kant's contribution to the history of thought about art, it will seek to contextualize such "Kantian" themes as judgment, taste, genius, beauty, sublimity and purposiveness. It will also consider to what degree our understanding of Kant has been shaped by later modernist assumptions about the character of his contribution.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICH3761HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:30 to 12:30
Instructors: Rebekah Smick
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 3 · Max: 15
ICH3761HS  L0101

Reconsidering Kant's Aesthetics

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Until recently, it was customary to regard Kant as the thinker who gave definitive form to the notion of aesthetic judgment and who succeeded in explaining why aesthetic experience is something essentially distinct from other kinds of experience. The postmodern rejection of the practice of aesthetic theory, however, has done much to undermine Kant's position vis-a-vis the arts. This course aims to re-examine Kant's aesthetic theory from the vantage point of the art theoretical literature that preceded it. In an effort to better understand Kant's contribution to the history of thought about art, it will seek to contextualize such "Kantian" themes as judgment, taste, genius, beauty, sublimity and purposiveness. It will also consider to what degree our understanding of Kant has been shaped by later modernist assumptions about the character of his contribution.

AD students enrol in ICH6761HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:30 to 12:30
Instructors: Rebekah Smick
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 3 · Max: 15
ICH5155HS  L0101

Albert the Great, Meister Eckhart and Women's Spirituality

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This seminar examines Meister Ekhart's mystical discours and its conceptual configuration as a 'contradictory monism' against the backdrop of the "Dioysian" tradition of Albert the Great (and Thomas Aquinas) and the current efflorescence of women's mysticism represented by Marguerite Porete

Schedule: Tuesday, 9:30 to 12:30
Instructors: Robert Sweetman
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 3 · Max: 15

11:00 to 13:00

WYT5565HS  L0101

Introduction to the Theology of Karl Barth

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Following the outline of Eberhard Busch`s book, The Great Passion, on Barth`s theology, questions will be raised for discussion about Barth`s treatment of the knowledge of God, Israel, God`s triunity, religion, creation, reconcilliation, ethics, church, time.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: David Demson
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
WYB1009HS  L0101

Introduction to the Old Testament as Scripture for the Church: Part II

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Introduction to Old Testament literature and history, with emphasis on application within the church. Readings, written assignments and final paper or exam.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Marion Ann Taylor
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Enrollment Notes: This course is a required introduction course for all Basic Degree programs and is recommended as a first year (or equivalent) course before more advanced Biblical courses are taken.
SMH5285HS  L0101

Russian Theologians

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Historical context and enduring influence of key theologians during the Silver Age of Russian culture: Vladimir Soloviev, Sergei Bulgakov, Pavel Florensky. Reading and analysis of representative works. Seminar, major essay. Lectures, seminars and discussion of texts.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: T. Allan Smith
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
EMT1851HS  L0101

Surat al-Baqara: An Introduction to the Qur'an

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Located in the beginning of the Qur'an immediately following a short introductory prayer, Surat al-Baqara is the doorway to understanding this scripture and its distinctive style and organization of ideas. The largest chapter in the corpus, it covers the major themes and discourses and is uniquely suited to begin the study of the Qur'an and related scholarship. This course is an introduction to the Qur'an and will familiarize students with the hallmarks of both traditional and western scholarships. It will cover topics such as the collection of the Qur'an, abrogation, mysterious letters and the Quranic sciences. Students will become acquainted with some of the main classical and modern commentaries and will learn how to identify Surat al-Baqara's distinctive structure and unifying themes.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Nevin Reda
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

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Quran course outline-2015.pdf435.95 KB
KNB3232HS  L0101

Bible in Context: Amos

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course uses the book of Amos as a means of introducing the covenantal values that lay beneath Israel's approach to social justice. Through a site visit and classroom activities, students will reflect on the Church's call to social justice and the way in which this can be realised in the lives of individuals and congregations. Additional emphasis will be placed on the content and shape of the book of Amos and the task of interpreting it as Scripture of the Church. Lecture. Written assignments, site visit, and final paper. Intro to OT (KNB1006) or equivalent, plus any 2000 level Bible course.

AD students enrol in KNB6232HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Brian Irwin
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
KNB6232HS  L0101

Bible in Context: Amos

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course uses the book of Amos as a means of introducing the covenantal values that lay beneath Israel's approach to social justice. Through a site visit and classroom activities, students will reflect on the Church's call to social justice and the way in which this can be realised in the lives of individuals and congregations. Additional emphasis will be placed on the content and shape of the book of Amos and the task of interpreting it as Scripture of the Church. Lecture. Written assignments, site visit, and final paper. Intro to OT (KNB1006) or equivalent, plus any 2000 level Bible course.

Basic Degree students enrol in KNB3232HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Brian Irwin
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGP3270HS  L0101

Discerning the Signs of the Times

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The aim of this course is threefold. 1. To expose the student to contemporary forms of critical and cultural analysis. 2. To use that analysis to look at spirituality. 3. To expose the student to contemporary manifestations of spirituality in a post-modern age.
For Basic Degree students there will be short papers, class presentations and class participation.   For Advanced Degree Students, in addition to the work done for the Basic Degree students there will be a major paper of 12-16 pages.

AD students enrol in RGP6270HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Geoffrey Williams
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 24
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
RGP6270HS  L0101

Discerning the Signs of the Times

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The aim of this course is threefold. 1. To expose the student to contemporary forms of critical and cultural analysis. 2. To use that analysis to look at spirituality. 3. To expose the student to contemporary manifestations of spirituality in a post-modern age.
For Basic Degree students there will be short papers, class presentations and class participation.   For Advanced Degree Students, in addition to the work done for the Basic Degree students there will be a major paper of 12-16 pages.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGP3270HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Geoffrey Williams
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 24
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
TRT5948HF  L0101

Critical Theory of Religion from a Psychoanalytic Perspective

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Inquiry into the role and meaning of religion in a post/metaphysical, post/secular time within the frameworks of critical theory, psychoanalysis and ethics. Authors include Horkheimer, Adorno, Benjamin, Freud, Habermas and their theological/religious interlocutors, i.e. Charles Davis, Elisabeth Schuessler Fiorenza, Hent de Vries. Major paper.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Marsha A. Hewitt
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 213
EMH3570HS  L0101

Issues in United Church History

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

In this course we will explore various facets of the United Church, such as the context of the union movement; the founding traditions; the search for denominational identity; the challenges of the post-WW II era; and transitions in its theology, social teaching, congregational life, and organizational cultue. We will be working mainly with primary sources. Lectures, group discussions. Mid-term writing projects and research paper.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Phyllis D. Airhart
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRP2875HS  L0101

Music in World Religions

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course explores world religions through music, one of the most universal features of human life. It will focus on the various traditions and phenomena of religious music in comparative perspective, and examine the way in which music reflects the religious tenets and has been used as a means of interacting with the divine. Covering seven of the major religions.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Hyun-Ah Kim
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 341
SAP3301HS  L0101

Advanced Homiletics

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Advanced Homiletics is a one-semester course that follows Introduction to Homiletics. This course gives students an opportunity to develop a theology of preaching based on the discussions of the survey of the tradition of Catholic preaching in Introduction to Homiletics and through opportunities to preach. Students will employ those characteristics of outstanding preaching as determined in Introduction to Homiletics. This course also gives students an opportunity to develop critical peer and self-assessment skills. Lectures, online postings, preaching, presentations and papers.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Peter Lovrick
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
KNP3731HS  L0101

Leadership Development for Intercultural Church

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The world is becoming increasingly intercultural, not only in the west but also in the east. How has the church prepared for intercultural church? This course will deal with cultural competency, sociocultural structures, ethnicity and churches, leadership and culture, leadership and power, intercultural communication, and contextualizing leadership. At the end of the course, we will develop a vision and strategy for intercultural church.

AD students enrol in KNP6731HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Nam Soon Song
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
KNP6731HS  L0101

Leadership Development for Intercultural Church

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The world is becoming increasingly intercultural, not only in the west but also in the east. How has the church prepared for intercultural church? This course will deal with cultural competency, sociocultural structures, ethnicity and churches, leadership and culture, leadership and power, intercultural communication, and contextualizing leadership. At the end of the course, we will develop a vision and strategy for intercultural church.

 

Basic Degree students enrol in KNP3731HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Nam Soon Song
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRB1007HS  L0101

Introduction to the Old Testament

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Through the experience of reading and reflecting on the entire text of the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament as well as key select passages, participants will have an opportunity to learn more about the sources, history, and development of the canonical books in critical relation to their place in ancient Near Eastern culture and history. Attention will be given to issues such as call, covenant, law, ritual, kingship, prophetic movements, reform movements, exile/deportation and return, wisdom and apocalyptic as shaping forces in biblical identity. Lectures and exegetical sessions will seek to assist participants with methodologies that will build their confidence and competence in engaging the texts in the context of the pastoral life of the church and in relation to contemporary culture and discourse.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Walter Deller
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: St. Hilda's College, Cartwright Hall
SAT2222HS  L0101

Mystery of the Trinity

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Mystery of the Triune God with its Biblical sources and Patristic development, and an examination of the development of the understanding of the Immanent Trinity, with attention paid to particular issues, e.g. Filioque, notion of 'Person'. Also stressed is the development of a Trinitarian spirituality with some attention to the mystics. Lectures, mid-term test, end of term test.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Gregory H. Carruthers
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

11:00 to 13:30

RGT6655HS  L0101

Ethics, Animals, and Christian Theology

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

In the last forty years ethical issues aroundthe care and treatment of non-huma animals has steadily grown as a concern in theology. While for much of this time it was considered at best a "marginal" issue, it is now one of the major concerns in environmental ethics. This course will examine the major figures in the development of "animal theology" in Protestant and Catholic theology. It will also look back to Christian Scripture and classical figures in the Christian tradition, and raise questions as to whether, and if so to what extent, the development of "animal theology" is either a departure from Christian tradition and/or a development within it. Issues in the course will include issues such as intensive agriculture (factory farming), the genetic modificiation of animals, zoos, pet, vegetarianism and veganism, and a variety of other issues that arise from human interaction with or concern for the well-being of non-human animals.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3655HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:30
Instructors: John Berkman
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 42
RGT3655HS  L0101

Ethics, Animals, and Christian Theology

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

In the last forty years ethical issues aroundthe care and treatment of non-huma animals has steadily grown as a concern in theology. While for much of this time it was considered at best a "marginal" issue, it is now one of the major concerns in environmental ethics. This course will examine the major figures in the development of "animal theology" in Protestant and Catholic theology. It will also look back to Christian Scripture and classical figures in the Christian tradition, and raise questions as to whether, and if so to what extent, the development of "animal theology" is either a departure from Christian tradition and/or a development within it. Issues in the course will include issues such as intensive agriculture (factory farming), the genetic modificiation of animals, zoos, pet, vegetarianism and veganism, and a variety of other issues that arise from human interaction with or concern for the well-being of non-human animals.

AD students enrol in RGT6655HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 11:00 to 13:30
Instructors: John Berkman
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 42

Afternoon Courses

13:00 to 17:00

RGP2105HS  L0101

The Art of the Presider

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Enrol with permission of instructor. This course aims to come to a deeper understanding and appreciation of the roles of both the presider and the assembly in the praise and worship of God. Tutorials, weekly readings, reflection paper, final examination.

Schedule: Tuesday, 13:00 to 17:00
Instructors: Joseph de Viveiros
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 10

14:00 to 16:00

TRP2622HS  L0101

God's Mission and the Church

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Building on focuses drawn from the book of Acts, participants will reflect on understandings of God's Mission and the Church's part that the mission, particularly in diversity of ministries in service of that mission; The course will draw on texts from Genesis, Isaiah, Luke and Romans, and as well as patristic, liturgical, spiritual writings and sermonic writing; Examining history of mission and the church, and contemporary congregational mission theory, we will consider alternative images and paradigms of mission; Lectures and book discussion sessions will seek to build participants' critical skill particularly in relation to conflict, healing, culture, pluriformity, and proclamation as part of mission; Participants will be required to meet and interview individuals involved in diverse forms of ministry in the community to develop their own vocational discernment and gain practical awareness of the issues, challenges and kills involved in differing forms of Spirit-led developments as congregations seek to participate and live God's mission.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Walter Deller
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
WYP1609HS  L0101

Community Development: The Art of Facilitation and Workshop Design

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

At the core of every community developer is a commitment to transformational teaching which unleashes within people the competencies to change their local community. Individual and group learning is possible when community members are treated with respect, feel safe to explore new ideas and can readily apply new learning to their present context. Based on both the theory and practice of adult learning and the biblical principle of discipleship, participants will  develop their personal capacity to facilitate both trainings & meetings and design workshops to move the community a step closer to peace and well being.

This course is also valuable for lay and ordained leaders in the church who may be called to lead adult Christian education courses, focus groups or other organizational meetings.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: W. Clayton Rowe
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Enrollment Notes: This class fulfills the Development Practice section within the MTS in urban and international development but is also open to M.Div. students or for continuing education of practitioners in the field.
SAP3331HS  L0101

Preaching Practicum

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · St. Augustine's (2661 Kingston Rd.) Scarborough Site

This pass/fail course offered to seminarians in their last semester at St. Augustine provides opportunities to investigate preaching from a Catholic perspective, discuss questions on homiletics, read key documents from the Church on preaching, preach, give feedback to fellow preachers, and reflect on the feedback received in class. Students will be assessed on a pass/fail basis for two homilies given in class, one paper on a theology of preaching, and two self-assessments.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Peter Lovrick
Teaching Methods: Practicum
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
EMT3604HS  L0101

Becoming Intercultural Communities

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will develop knowledge and practice skills for intercultural life and leadership in heterogeneous publics. We will draw on interdisciplinary, intercultural materials, including: critical social and cultural theories, formation of complex identities at intersections of structures of social markers; scriptural, theological and ethical attention to difference and similarity; worship and educational resources; and the case of the United Church of Canada project "Becoming an Intercultural Church" as a vision and practice to live out its commitment to racial and social justice. (Qualifies as a designated elective in theology or ethics.) Seminar format with instructional input, small groups, modest cross-cultural immersion project. Evaluation: a book review (30%); a class presentation (30%), and a final integrative project (40%). Prerequisites: basic course in bible and theology.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Marilyn J. Legge
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Enrollment Notes: This course will serve as a designated elective in Ethics or Church and Community under the MDiv program, and as a designated elective in Social Ethics under the MPS Social Service stream program.
SMT2433HS  L0101

Sacramental Life

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Biblical, historical, systematic, and pastoral study of sacraments of initiation (baptism, confirmation, Eucharist), sacraments of healing (reconciliation, sacrament of the sick), sacraments of vocation (marriage and vocation). Readings, lectures, discussions, weekly assignments, short papers or research paper.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Darren Dias
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SAT1703HS  L0101

Scholastic Philosophical Concepts

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An introduction to scholastic terms and concepts in the context of their use in the philosophical theology of Thomas Aquinas. Readings cover texts that treat the existence and attributes of God, being and essence, form and matter, substance and accident, the human soul and its faculties, happiness, human action, and natural law. Lectures, discussion; short papers, essay, and final exam.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Pamela J. Reeve
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8
KNT1101HS  L0101

Reformed Theology in Dialogue

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course introduces students to the central categories of Christian theology as these loci have been developed in what the Christian tradition has called Systematic Theology. The course will focus on how these major doctrinal themes have been articulated in the Reformed Protestant tradition, and set this perspective in dialogue with other traditional, contemporary, and ecumenical perspectives in theology. Each topic will be explored in relation to its classical formulation as well as with reference to modern (and postmodern) reassessments of the classical tradition in the cultural and global context of the Christian churches in the 21st century. Lectures, weekly reflection assignments, final essay.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: John A. Vissers
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
EMT2102HS  L0101

Theology II

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

In this course, students work on constructing their own theologies of salvation (soteriology) in dialogue with questions raised by key historical and contemporary theologians.  We will explore soteriology as it relates to theologies of atonement, sin and evil, creation, redemption and eschatology, and the roles played by God and humanity and the person and work of Jesus Christ in processes of redemption.  We also explore how key historical movements of social and theological change, as well as pressing, contemporary pastoral questions related to gender-based violence, political and social liberation movements, global Christianity, and inter-faith relations contribute to our own understandings of salvation.  Student work will be evaluated based on participation, short figure-based interpretive papers, and a final integrative, constructive theological paper.  Prerequisite: one introductory course in systematic theology.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Natalie Wigg-Stevenson
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
KNP2101HS  L0101

Worship Practicum

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Building on introductory worship courses, this course will explore worship as a theological practice. It will examine a series of topics related to the development of worship leadership skills, nurturing community through worship, and effective worship practices for the contemporary church. the first part of the course will ask the question; How do we as worship leaders understand the realities facing worshipping communities in the twenty-first century? The second part of the course asks: How do we as worship leaders practice evaluation and discernment in a diverse and dynamic twenty-first century context?

Chapel attendance is mandatory.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Sarah Travis
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT2341HS  L0101

Eschatology

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Introduction to the teachings of the Christian Church and theological understanding concerning eschatology both as it has developed in the tradition and in the renewed interest it has gained from some of the significant theologians of the 20th C. Topics include: philosophical foundations, eschatology in the OT and NT, immortality and resurrection, theology of death and afterlife, individual and communal judgement, parousia, apocalyptic, political eschatology. Short paper, book review, final exam, class participation.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: John Dadosky
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 16
SMB2251HS  L0101

Israel's Prophetic Traditions

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An examination of the "rise and fall" of prophecy in ancient Israel, considered within its historical context. Topics include the ancient Near Eastern background, the social location of Israelite prophets, true and false prophecy, modes of prophetic speech, interpretation of the individual prophetic books, the demise of prophecy, and its possible role in the development of apocalyptic. Assigned readings, class lectures and discussion. Participation, class presentations, paper proposal, research paper, application paper. Prerequisite: SMB1007: Introduction to the Old Testament or equivalent.

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: John L. McLaughlin
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

14:00 to 17:00

EMP1101HS  L0101

Worship I: Foundations of Christian Public Worship

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An introduction to the history, theology and practice of Christian public worship, with particular reference to the foundational practices of Eucharist and Christian initiation in the Reformed and Methodist liturgical traditions, set in the context of ecumenical developments and influences. Biblical, historical, theological and pastoral dimensions will be explored through in-class and online lectures and presentations, readings, papers, online assignments, worship, discussion, and practica/tutorials (held in the third hour of class time). Participation (incluing prayer leadership and online discussion), 15%; Liturgical Repertoire (memorization), 10%; Participant-Observer analysis of worship, 25%; Book Relflections, 50%. (Fulfills testamur requirement for United Church of Canada candidates for ordered ministry and admittands.)

Schedule: Tuesday, 14:00 to 17:00
Instructors: William Kervin
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

16:00 to 18:00

RGP3682HS  L0101

Integration for Ministerial Theory & Praxis

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Seminar in which participants reflect on process of integration in their personal and ministerial lives within ambience of doing theology in context of MAMS degree. For Regis students only. Requirements: class participation, written assignments, final paper.

Schedule: Tuesday, 16:00 to 18:00
Instructors: TBA
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 42
EMB1512HS  L0101

Elementary New Testament Greek II

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Introduction to ancient Greek grammar for the sake of reading the New Testament. The focus will be on the continuation of the basic aspects of grammar and syntax together with selected readings from the New Testament. Weekly class participation, quizzes, final exam. Prerequisite: EMB1511HF.

Schedule: Tuesday, Thursday, 16:00 to 18:00
Instructors: John Egger
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5

16:30 to 18:30

RGP6688HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/05/20

Integration for Ministry II

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Through the development of the skill of theological reflection, the participants learn to reflect on their personal and ministerial or work experiences to discern the call of transformation and integration in the midst of the Christian tradition and world realities. This group process takes place in a peer faith setting. Designed for Regis IFM students. Others accepted with permission of professor. An overnight retreat is scheduled at the end of the course. Final integration paper and mission statement. Pass/Fail for BD students; grade given for AD students.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGP3688HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 16:30 to 18:30
Instructors: Michael Stoeber
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 24
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
RGP3688HS  L0101

Integration for Ministry II

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Through the development of the skill of theological reflection, the participants learn to reflect on their personal and ministerial or work experiences to discern the call of transformation and integration in the midst of the Christian tradition and world realities. This group process takes place in a peer faith setting. Regular attendance required. An overnight retreat is scheduled at the end of the course. One integration paper and mission statement. Pass/Fail for BD students; grade given for AD students.

AD students enrol in RGP6688HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 16:30 to 18:30
Instructors: Maureen McDonnell
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 24
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)

17:10 to 19:10

SMT1904HS  L0101

Fundamental Themes in Christian Ethics

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course explores themes required for an understanding of the moral subject and moral actions. Topics include: Old Testament and New Testament ethics; current ethical theories especially Natural Law; formation of conscience, sin, conversion and the role of the Magisterium.

Schedule: Tuesday, 17:10 to 19:10
Instructors: Moira McQueen
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

18:30 to 21:00

EMP2015HS  L0101

Buddhism and Psychotherapy

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

In recent years a voluminol JS literature has appeared that has examined the numerous commonalities between western psychotherapy and counselling and Buddhism. This has been possible because Buddhism, in addition to its religious aspects, can also be described as a philosophy and psychology of transformation. The Buddhist teachings are replete with analyses of human behavior, emotion, cognition, interpersonal and psychological functioning that closely resemble the models of human behavior and mental illness that have emerged in western culture. In this comparative course the convergence between Buddhism and the major systems of psychotherapy will be surveyed.  Specifically, the key features of psychoanalytic, behavioral, cognitive, existential-humanistic, emotion-focused, mindfulness-based interventions, and the emerging field of positive psychology will each first be described. Convergences and divergences with the key elements of Buddhist psychology as described in the teachings on skillful living (i.e., the 8-fold path), harmful emotional states (i.e., the 5 nivaranas), the psychophysical nature of the self (i.e., the 5 skandhas), psychological causality (i.e., dependent origination), and the analysis of the human condition (i.e. the 4 Noble Truths) will be underscored.

Students will critically study the key representative texts for each form of psychotherapy and the major Buddhist sutras/teachings that elaborate the Buddha's psychology with the goal of evaluating how the study of Buddhist psychology may enhance our understanding of emotional suffering and its alleviation.

Schedule: Tuesday, 18:30 to 21:00
Instructors: Tony Toneatto
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

19:00 to 21:00

KNH2010HS  L0101

History of Christianity II (843-1648)

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Development of thought and piety; monasticism and mendicants; crusades, parish life; papacy, princes and church councils; Byzantium; East-West relations; relations with Jews and Muslims; Renaissance and reformations; reformers; missionary expansion; confessionalism. Lectures. NOTE: Students who have taken --H2002H Medieval Christianity (600-1500) and/or --H2003H Reformation & Early Modern Christianity, may not take Christianity II (843-1648). Prerequisite: 1000 level history course. Primary source, assignment, paper, take home final.

Schedule: Tuesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Stuart Macdonald
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRT2802HS  L0101

Beyond Homelessness

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A study of the nature of postmodern homelessness in the light of a theological and phenomenological analysis of homecoming and homemaking. Biblical themes such as creation, exodus, covenant, land and kingdom will be interpreted in the context of present experiences of social homelessness, geo-political violence, international refugees, disconnectedness to the earth and an overwhelming sense of being nomads without roots in any place of community. Seminar. Evaluation: Class Participation 25%, reflection papers or one major essay 75%.

Schedule: Tuesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Schedule Notes: Location: CRC Wycliffe
Instructors: Brian Walsh
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SMJ3609HS  L0101

Catholic Social Teaching

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course traces the development of Catholic Social Teaching and action from an historical and theological perspective. A Christian concept of justice will be explored within Biblical and theological contexts. Cultural developments that have impacted, and those that continue to influence, social thought, teaching and action within the Church will be discussed. The primary texts for the course are the social documents of the Church beginning with the Encyclical of Pope Leo XIII, Rerum Novarum (1891) and continuing to the present day. Students will become familiar with the content of such documents and they will be encouraged to analyse the theological and social foundations upon which the documents have been developed. Key principles of Catholic Social Teaching will be introduced. The course will also explore the Christian call to justice and ways in which the social teachings of the Church can be integrated into personal spirituality and ministry. To facilitate such integration, examples will be highlighted from the lives of social activists within the Church. Teaching and learning methods will include, lecture, discussion, media and biographical analysis.

Schedule: Tuesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Mary Rowell
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological, Pastoral Theology
Enrollment Notes: This is an inter-disciplinary course that is cross-listed to the Historical, Pastoral Theological and Theological Departments.
RGP6565HS  L0101

Contemporary Family Therapy and Spiritual Care

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will examine and compare Contemporary Family Systems Therapies, with introductory exposure to Transgenerational (Bowen); Contextual (Boszormenyi-Nagy); Milan Systemic (Boscolo, Cecchin, Hoffman); Structural (Minuchin), Strategic (Haley); Experiential (Satir and Whittaker), and Object Relations (Fairbairn, Klein, Wlnnicott) Therapies, with the inclusion of spiritual care perspectives on these models. This course is designed to address requirements from the Entry-to-Practice Competency Profile for Registered Psychotherapists (RP), Ontario, for: "Foundations" (1.1-1.5), "Collegial & lnterprofessional Relationships (2.1-2.3), and "Therapeutic Process" (4.1-4.7).

While this course is mainly intended for psychotherapists, pastoral counsellors (PCE), institutional spiritual care providers (CPE), and family therapists (AAMFT/OAMFT), it will also be of interest to those who are not counselling professionals, but who may provide multi-cultural and multi-faith care in public and private settings. Theological reflection and pastoral integration of current psychotherapeutic research and practice will be emphasized.

 

Basic Degree students enrol in RGP3565HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Desmond Buhagar
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 16
Additional Notes: This course was previously taught under the title 'Family Therapy in Pastoral Perspective'
RGP3565HS  L0101

Contemporary Family Therapy and Spiritual Care

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will examine and compare Contemporary Family Systems Therapies, with introductory exposure to Transgenerational (Bowen); Contextual (Boszormenyi-Nagy); Milan Systemic (Boscolo, Cecchin, Hoffman); Structural (Minuchin), Strategic (Haley); Experiential (Satir and Whittaker), and Object Relations (Fairbairn, Klein, Wlnnicott) Therapies, with the inclusion of spiritual care perspectives on these models. This course is designed to address requirements from the Entry-to-Practice Competency Profile for Registered Psychotherapists (RP), Ontario, for: "Foundations" (1.1-1.5), "Collegial & lnterprofessional Relationships (2.1-2.3), and "Therapeutic Process" (4.1-4.7).

While this course is mainly intended for psychotherapists, pastoral counsellors (PCE), institutional spiritual care providers (CPE), and family therapists (AAMFT/OAMFT), it will also be of interest to those who are not counselling professionals, but who may provide multi-cultural and multi-faith care in public and private settings. Theological reflection and pastoral integration of current psychotherapeutic research and practice will be emphasized.

 

AD students enrol in RGP6565HS.

Schedule: Tuesday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Desmond Buhagar
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 16
Additional Notes: This course was previously taught under the title 'Family Therapy in Pastoral Perspective'

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