Course Timetable for Friday: Winter of 2015

Morning Courses

9:00 to 11:00

SAT2331HS  L0101

Grace and Glory

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The second course on Theological Anthropology comprises two main sections, Grace and Glory: (1) God's universal salvific will in predestination. Christian Justification and the new creation in Christ. The new life in Christ through the interior journey and working within the Church for the world. (2) Eschatology, the fulfillment of grace. One midterm test, one mini-synthesis, and a final oral examination.

Schedule: Friday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Charles Anang
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SAP1711HS  L0101

Introduction to Canon Law

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A survey of selected topics from the 1983 Code of Canon Law: history, sources and structure of the Code; people of God; hierarchical structures in the Church; consecrated and apostolic life; teaching, sanctifying and governing functions in the Church; temporal goods; sanctions and processes in the Church. Course evaluation will be based on class participation (20%), case study (40%), and final oral exam (40%).

Schedule: Friday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Ivan P. Camilleri
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8

09:00 to 15:00

RGT2810HS  L0101

Pastoral Competency

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A review of the moral, pastoral and canonical principles of sound ministerial practice in the Roman Catholic tradition, along with an intensive practicum. Online component, lecture, discussion, tutoring. For lay students and ordination candidates in the M.Div. program at Regis College only. Oral Examination for pass/fail credit. Prerequisite: permission of the Regis College M.Div. Director.

 

Schedule: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, 09:00 to 15:00 · Begins: 04/13 · Ends: 04/21
Instructors: Gilles Mongeau
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 12

9:30 to 12:30

ICT3736HS  L0101

Birthpangs of the New Creation: Judgment unto Salvation In the Book of Revelation

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

In our culture, "apocalypse" typically refers to a cataclysmic, catastrophic ending, real or imagined. Often this meaning, in which fear eclipses hope, is traced back to the biblical tradition. But what if the book from which we derive the term, i.e. the "Apocalypse"-or "Revelation"-of John, refers less to the end of the world than to a transition between the two Ages? What if that transition is characterized as double-edged: as both 'the death throes of the old world order' and 'the birthpangs of the new creation'?

Attentive to the nature of apocalyptic discourse, this course will seek to develop a key area of systematic theology by exploring the topics of death, judgment, heaven, and hell-the 'four last things' of traditional eschatology-as they are portrayed in the book of Revelation. In allowing lntertexual and intratextual webs of meaning to emerge, we will pay special attention to the way in which Old Testament echoes, together with the book's own symbolic coherence and narrative logic, can open up new avenues for exegesis, and for theological reflection.

The topic of Final Judgment will be a special focus. How is this to be conceived in the light of the apocalyptic transition? If the first reference to Babylon in the biblicaJ canon, the Babel narrative of Gen 11 , refers to a judgment that does not bring history to an end but opens It up once again to the dissemination motif of Gen 1 :28, is it possible to detect a parallel 'judgment unto salvation' theme in the final book of the New Testament?

Our discussions will explore the interface between biblical studies, the "theological Interpretation of Scripture," and contemporary eschatology. Familiarity with New Testament Greek is an advantage but is not a prerequisite.

AD students enrol in ICT6736HS.

Schedule: Friday, 9:30 to 12:30
Instructors: Nicholas Ansell
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 3 · Max: 15

09:30 to 12:30

ICT6736HS  L0101

Birthpangs of the New Creation: Judgment unto Salvation In the Book of Revelation

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

In our culture, "apocalypse" typically refers to a cataclysmic, catastrophic ending, real or imagined. Often this meaning, in which fear eclipses hope, is traced back to the biblical tradition. But what if the book from which we derive the term, i.e. the "Apocalypse"-or "Revelation"-of John, refers less to the end of the world than to a transition between the two Ages? What if that transition is characterized as double-edged: as both 'the death throes of the old world order' and 'the birthpangs of the new creation'? Attentive to the nature of apocalyptic discourse, this course will seek to develop a key area of systematic theology by exploring the topics of death, judgment, heaven, and hell-the 'four last things' of traditional eschatology-as they are portrayed in the book of Revelation. In allowing lntertexual and intratextual webs of meaning to emerge, we will pay special attention to the way in which Old Testament echoes, together with the book's own symbolic coherence and narrative logic, can open up new avenues for exegesis, and for theological reflection. The topic of Final Judgment will be a special focus. How is this to be conceived in the light of the apocalyptic transition? If the first reference to Babylon in the biblicaJ canon, the Babel narrative of Gen 11 , refers to a judgment that does not bring history to an end but opens It up once again to the dissemination motif of Gen 1 :28, is it possible to detect a parallel 'judgment unto salvation' theme in the final book of the New Testament? Our discussions will explore the interface between biblical studies, the "theological Interpretation of Scripture," and contemporary eschatology. Familiarity with New Testament Greek is an advantage but is not a prerequisite.

Basic Degree students enrol in ICT3736HS.

Schedule: Friday, 09:30 to 12:30
Instructors: Nicholas Ansell
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

11:00 to 13:00

SAT2432HS  L0101

Sacramental Theology II

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Historical and systematic study of the sacraments of healing (penance and anointing of the sick) and sacraments of growth (marriage and orders) with special consideration of the pastoral viewpoint. Three short papers, seminars, final exam.

Schedule: Friday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Mark Robson
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SAT2706HS  L0101

Introduction to Metaphysics

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course is a philosophical examination of some fundamental questions in Christian metaphysics: Can we prove that God exists?  What is God like?  What is creation?  How are God and creation related?  More particularly, if God created everything, how do evolution and the Big Bang fit into the picture?  We will attempt to formulate our own answers to each of these questions; but our discussion will make constant reference to the answers already present in the Christian tradition, especially to those of Thomas Aquinas. Lectures, discussions, short papers and final exam.

Schedule: Friday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Sean Mulrooney
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 20

Afternoon Courses


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