Biblical Courses for the 2014 Summer Session

Course Listings by Level

1000 Level Courses
SAB1003HF  L6101

Introduction to the Old Testament

Offered in Summer 2014  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2013 · Online Course

A study of the Old Testament covering biblical books, their historical contexts, genres and ancient Near Eastern cultural contexts necessary for interpretation. The basics of exegetical method particular to the genres of the Old Testament will be covered. Principles of biblical interpretation will also be covered especially from a Catholic perspective. Lectures and assignments including quizzes, exams and a final paper.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Schedule Notes:   April 28, 2014 to July 27, 2014
Instructors: Igal German
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 25
Enrollment Notes:   Registration Deadline: April 21, 2014; Withdrawal Deadline: May 20, 2014
Additional Notes:   All tuition and fee charges posted to the SWS/ROSI account are payable when billed.
WYB1008HF  L6101

Introduction to the Old Testament I

Offered in Summer 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Online Course

Introduction to Old Testament literature and history (Genesis-Kings) with emphasis on application within the church. The course consists of online written lectures with class participation through discussion forums. Readings, written assignments and final paper.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: 04/14 · Ends: 06/06
Schedule Notes: April 14, 2014 - June 06, 2014
Instructors: Brian T. German
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 10 · Max: 20
SAB1081HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2013/06/17

New Testament Hermeneutics

Offered in Summer 2014  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2013 · St. Augustine's (2661 Kingston Rd.) Scarborough Site

Survey of New Testament world, authors, theologies. Introduction to the historical-critical and other methods of exegesis. Focus on the relation of hermeneutic to Christian Theological traditions; determining the senses of Scripture, the intent of the author, the structures in the texts; stance of the reader. Lecture/Discussion; paper; mid-term and final exam.

Schedule: Tuesday, Thursday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Francis G. Carpinelli
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 8
WYB1501HS  L6101

From the Gospel to the Gospels (NT I)

Offered in Summer 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Online Course

An introduction to the four Gospels in their social, historical and theological settings. Using a "socio-literary" approach, we will study the Gospels within a two-dimensional framework, both centred on what the early Christians called the "gospel" or "Kerygma." One dimension has to do with social history the origin and development of Christianity as a distinct social entity, from its foundations in the ministry of Jesus and the Easter experience, through its emergence as a Jewish renewal movement, and on to its development into a separate, largely Gentile, institutionalized religion. The second dimension has to do with literature the process by which the Gospels came to be written, their literary form and texture, and their character as narrative versions of the "gospel." Weekly online lectures, assigned analysis/reflection papers, discussion board postings.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: 06/09 · Ends: 08/01
Instructors: Allan Loder
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 10 · Max: 20
Enrollment Notes: Last date to drop the class is Jun 20, 2014
2000 Level Courses
EMB2301HF  L0101

The Foreigner in Biblical Law

Offered in Summer 2014  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Can an understanding of the resident alien in the Bible help us reflect today concerning the manner in which we treat "the foreigner" in our society and particular communities? Students in this course will conduct a literary survey of the resident alien (a translation of the Hebrew term ) throughout various biblical law codes. Using a method of inner-biblical criticism and reception history, students will observe contextual changes in meaning of this figure through time. Texts to be studied will range from Ancient Near Eastern law codes, law codes of the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament), along with readings from the Septuagint, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and the New Testament. Lectures, assigned readings involving both biblical texts and secondary literature, and class discussion. Course evaluation: one book review (to be submitted at the first class), class participation, student presentation, and major paper. Prerequisite: Introduction to Old Testament I or permission of the instructor.

Schedule: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, 09:30 to 12:30 · Begins: 06/02 · Ends: 06/12
Schedule Notes: 02 June 2014 - 12 June 2014
Instructors: Carmen Palmer
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 10
Enrollment Notes: Last day to register: May 20 / to drop: June 4
Additional Notes: Last day to pay for this course is May 23.

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Foreigner in Biblical Law EMB 2301.pdf77.66 KB
SMB2673HS  L0101

Gospel of John

Offered in Summer 2014  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2010 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

John offers a contemplative and summary Gospel for those who have already journeyed through the earlier stages of Christian experience. This course will consider the distinctive theological and literary character of the Gospel of John with special attention to the evangelist's creative reshaping of tradition in response to the circumstances of the church at the end of the first century. The social and ecclesial situation in which the fourth gospel was written will provide the context in which to locate the theological, pastoral and rhetorical strategies used by the evangelist. Weekly assignments, final paper, class preparation and participation. Prerequisite: SMB 1501 (or equivalent).

Schedule: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, 1730 to 2100 · Begins: 06/23 · Ends: 07/04
Schedule Notes: Classes will be held from Monday to Friday during the week of June 23.  Classes in the second week starts on July 2, Wednesday and ends on July 4, Friday.  Total of 8 classes. Class Time: 5:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Instructors: Michael Steinhauser
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 12
EMB2801HF  L0101

New Testament Responses to Violence

Offered in Summer 2014  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A variety of recent political events have confronted students of theology with the spectre of violence in recent years, inevitably raising the question of how to engage the issue theologically. This course will aid students' engagement with various forms of violence (imperial, gender, economic, etc.) through the various New Testament authors and their own dealings with the issues. Indeed, insofar as the Bible is accorded significant political value, it is vital - regardless of one's own religious proclivities - to understand what the texts contained in the New Testament have to report on these issues in their own era. This course surveys various points at which New Testament authors encountered the violence. It aims to acquaint students with the social world of the New Testament, to familiarize students in major issues in the study of the New Testament, and to aid students in the development of a biblical hermeneutic conscious of its implications.

Schedule: Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, 13:30 to 16:30 · Begins: 06/17 · Ends: 06/27
Schedule Notes: 17 June 2014 - 27 June 2014
Instructors: Christopher B. Zeichman
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 10
Enrollment Notes: This course has been offered previously under the title 'New Testament Responses to Imperial Violence'.  Major syllabus change effective 20145
Additional Notes: Last day to register: June 2 / to drop: June 18 / to pay: June 4

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New Testament Responses to Violence -2014 draft Syllabus.pdf198.42 KB
EMB2911HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/03/05

Why Scrolls Matter. An Introduction to the Dead Sea Scrolls as a Template for Abrahamic Traditions

Offered in Summer 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The Dead Sea Scrolls (DSS) provide an important template for those wishing to study
scripture or exegetical material of any Abrahamic tradition (whether Jewish, Christian, or Muslim) and its formation. The scrolls frequently reinterpret texts which highlight a "particular type of intertextuality which exists between an authoritative scriptural antecedent and its subsequent reuse in a type of rewriting, in which there is a close textual relationship between the scriptural predecessor and the rewritten work" (Petersen 2012: 485). This tradition of reinterpreted scripture, seen as a "textual strategy" (Petersen 484), is present within varying DSS literary genres of authoritative scriptural texts, legal rules, religious disputes, liturgical traditions, and even commentaries. Such a practice of reinterpreting earlier texts is found within not only Jewish scripture but is also similar to what one finds in early Christian and Islamic scriptural and exegetical traditions as' well. Having such a comprehension is helpful for exegesis and understanding the underlying purpose of any of the above scriptural and textual traditions. Thus this course undertakes a study of the practice of reinterpreted scripture as evidenced in the DSS genres of scripture, legal rules, religious disputes, liturgical traditions, and commentaries (pesharim). An introduction to the scrolls, their discovery and preservation, their sectarian nature and the related history of the Qumran site will also be addressed as an essential component of understanding the nature of the scrolls.

Schedule: Saturday, 10:00 to 17:00 · Begins: 05/31 · Ends: 06/21
Schedule Notes: May 31, June 7, 14 & 21, 2014
Instructors: Carmen Palmer
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 10
Enrollment Notes: OT/HB is preferred, but any TST scriptural introduction course may qualify as prerequisite.
Additional Notes: Last day to register: May 16 / to drop: June 5 / to pay: May 23
EMB2941HF  L0101

Reading Biblical Texts Contextually: Mark and Paul in Asian Biblical Interpretation

Offered in Summer 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

All reading of biblical texts takes place in a context. Paying attention to how context affects reading provides insight, not only into the process of the reception of biblical texts, but also into the biblical texts themselves. This course explores the dynamic of reading biblical texts by examining how selected passages from the Gospel of Mark and the letters of Paul have been taken up in recent years specifically within two related fields of discourse: what is often described as Asian biblical interpretation, and its cousin, Asian American biblical interpretation. Through assigned readings, lectures, class discussions, student presentations, and individual case studies of specific biblical texts, this course will introduce students to published materials in Asian and Asian American biblical interpretation, and in so doing give students an opportunity to reflect on their own context as a lens for interpretation.

Schedule: Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, 09:30 to 12:30 · Begins: 05/20 · Ends: 05/30
Schedule Notes: Tuesday - Friday, May 20-23 & 27-30, 2014
Instructors: John Egger
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 10
Additional Notes: Last day to register: May 9 / to drop: May 22 / to pay: May 16

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Syllabus EMB 2941HF.pdf154.06 KB
3000 Level Courses
KNB3351HF  L0101

The Message and Social World of Hebrew Prophets

Offered in Summer 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

During this course we will study some of the most interesting material in the Hebrew Scriptures (Old Testament). Our study will concentrate on the Hebrew prophets; their life (time), work, and message (pre-exilic, exilic, and post-exilic) as it unfolds within their historical and social context We will examine the theological significance for their time but also how it translates into the world of the New Testament and the setting of a post-modern reader. The course has both Biblical and theological content.

Schedule: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, 09:30 to 12:30 · Begins: 06/09 · Ends: 06/20
Instructors: Aubrey Botha
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: The course was originally approved with the title "Social World of Ancient Israel".
WYB3655HF  L0101

Gospel of Mark

Offered in Summer 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A consecutive exegetical examination of the Gospel of Mark with discussion of critical issues in gospel studies. Prerequisite: Introduction to NT. Reading, commentary writing, participation.

Please note there is a pre-assignment for this course, due on the first day of class (see syllabus).

Schedule: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday · Begins: 04/21 · Ends: 04/25
Instructors: Ann Jervis
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
TRB3911HF  L0101

History of Biblical Interpretation

Offered in Summer 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

For most of Christian history the interpretation of the Bible was a pastoral activity. Drawing on basic notions of post-modern consideration of 'reader response', we will survey the pre-critical interpretation history of the Bible from a diachronic perspective as an unfolding process across history, and in key synchronic snapshots focusing on types of interpretation as specific moments in the history. How do interpretations reflect and repress the tensions, inner dynamics and problematics of the biblical texts to which they are a response? How are they responses to the needs of the community in specific places and times? We will examine theories of interpretation and and also actual examples of interpretation from various periods. Broad topics will include: early Christian interpretation of texts from Leviticus and Ecclesiastes, hermeneutic approaches of Origen, Augustine, Luther and others, mediaeval readings of the book of Ruth, Luther and Calvin as archetypal Reformation readers of scripture, visual art as a form of biblical interpretation, the emergence of historical-critical models of reading, and the cantatas and Passions of J.S. Bach as instances of affective and intellective interpretation.

Schedule: Monday, Wednesday, 18:00 to 21:00 · Begins: 05/26 · Ends: 06/25
Instructors: Walter Deller
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Theological
Enrollment Notes: Withdrawal deadline: May 28, 2014
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin building, room 340
5000 Level Courses
WYB5021HF  L0101

The Book of Ecclesiastes

Offered in Summer 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Close reading in Hebrew of the Book of Ecclesiastes (Koheleth). The course will introduce students to modem historical-critical approaches to Koheleth in conjunction Hebrew reading, syntax, grammar, and exegesis. Recent commentary treatments (Longman, Bartholomew, Fox, and others) will be reviewed for strengths and weaknesses. The place of Ecclesiastes in so-called 'Wisdom Literature' will be examined. alongside its location in the canon. Older classical treatments of Koheleth (Luther) will also be evaluated. The place of the Epilogue and its hermeneutical function, as well as the traditional ascription to Solomon, will be reviewed.

Schedule: Monday, Wednesday, Friday, 10:00 to 13:00
Schedule Notes: Course will run from April 21 to May 9 The Wycliffe Centre for Scripture and Theology event (Ecclesiates) is required attendance on May 9 and 10
Instructors: Christopher Seitz
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
6000 Level Courses
KNB6351HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/02/12

Social World of Ancient Israel

Offered in Summer 2014  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This advanced seminar will be grounded in a sociological study of ancient Israel as a basis for critical applications/appropriation of social world topics in contemporary contexts. Social scientific models have been used in biblical studies to describe, analyze and contextualize social realities such as: social groups (e.g., family, clan, tribe, elite classes); cultural relationships (e.g., honor/shame, marriage; debt servitude); patterns of behavior (e.g., sacrifice, prophecy, gender); political structures (e.g., monarchy, empire); political, economic and social change (e.g., emergence of states, changes in social stratification); historical eras (e.g., early Israel, Judah under Persian rule); and socially constructed realities (e.g., ethnicity, gender, language and rhetoric, symbolism). When practiced with post-modem and ideological criticisms, social scientific criticism also identifies the social context of the interpreter and the construction and use of models and interpretation of data in contemporary contexts and issues.

The first part of the course will cover methods and topics in the sociology of  ncient Israel, reading in the literature of social scientific criticism in the last three decades in Hebrew Bible studies. We will study the impact of social scientific  methods on Biblical research and interpretation, including perspectives that emerged in biblical studies across disciplines with literary, feminist, ideological, liberation theology, and global hermeneutical approaches. We will consider heuristic models for appropriating and critiquing insights from the study of ancient social worlds in contemporary applications. In the second half of the course, each student will give a seminar presentation that reviews one of the topics of the social world of the HB. The final research paper assigned will use a social scientific reading of an HB text to create a hermeneutic for appropriation of ancient data, and suggest connections to a contemporary social issue. Contemporary issues for student research focus can include gender, feminism, land, ecology, stratification, cities, community, empire and resistance, etc.

Basic Degree students enrol in KNB3351HF.

Schedule: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, 09:30 to 12:30 · Begins: 06/09 · Ends: 06/20
Instructors: Patricia Dutcher-Walls
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Enrollment Notes: Students should have a minimum of two semesters of graduate level study of the Old Testament/Hebrew Bible.
WYB6655HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/02/11

Gospel of Mark

Offered in Summer 2014  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A consecutive exegetical examination of the Gospel of Mark with discussion of critical issues in gospel studies. Prerequisite: Introduction to NT. Reading, commentary writing, participation.

Basic Degree students enrol in WYB3655HF.

Schedule: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday · Begins: 04/21 · Ends: 04/25
Schedule Notes: Course registration opens on ROSI April 1, 2014 and the last date to register is April 14, 2014 Last date to drop is April 22,2014
Instructors: Ann Jervis
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 8

47 Queen's Park Crescent East · Toronto, Ontario · M5S 2C3 · Canada · Tel: 416-978-4039 · Fax: 416-978-7821 · E-mail: inquiries @ tst.edu
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Biblical Courses for the <em>2014</em> Summer Session

Biblical Courses for the <em>2014</em> Summer Session