Course Timetable for Monday: Winter of 2015

Morning Courses

9:00 to 11:00

WYT3501HS  L0101

History of Early Modern European Christian Thought

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course surveys aspects of Christian thinking (not necessarily strictly theology) of the early modern period, concentrating on France, England, and representatives from other Western European countries. Lectures and readings focus on the question of (re)defining Christian identity, within several areas of religious concern: devotional life, epistemology, human history, and social relations. The course aims to provide students with first-hand knowledge of primary material that was either influential upon or typical of fundamental (though often conflictual) ways of construing Christian identity during this period and that have remained, in various guises, still a part of contemporary Christian outlooks. Course requirements include attendance at lectures and tutorials, the extensive assigned reading; 1-page weekly critical overviews, and the choice of a final exam or final paper.

AD students enrol in WYT6501HS.

Schedule: Monday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Ephraim Radner
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
WYT6501HS  L0101

History of Early Modern European Christian Thought

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course surveys aspects of Christian thinking (not necessarily strictly theology) of the early modern period, concentrating on France, England, and representatives from other Western European countries. Lectures and readings focus on the question of (re)defining Christian identity, within several areas of religious concern: devotional life, epistemology, human history, and social relations. The course aims to provide students with first-hand knowledge of primary material that was either influential upon or typical of fundamental (though often conflictual) ways of construing Christian identity during this period and that have remained, in various guises, still a part of contemporary Christian outlooks. Course requirements include attendance at lectures and tutorials, the extensive assigned reading; 1-page weekly critical overviews, and the choice of a final exam or final paper.

Basic Degree students enrol in WYT3501HS.

Schedule: Monday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Ephraim Radner
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SAP3533HS  L0101

Ministry of Reconciliation

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · St. Augustine's (2661 Kingston Rd.) Scarborough Site

Reconciliation in the Church today; a practical "case approach" to the ministry of sacramental reconciliation; art of the confessor. Case preparation, discussions, final exam. Prerequisite: Previous studies in Fundamental Christian Ethics, Human Sexuality and Marriage, Bioethics and Social Justice. Integrated practicum for those entering ordained ministry.

Schedule: Monday, 9:00 to 11:00
Instructors: Thomas Lynch
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

09:00 to 11:50

CGB2511HS  L4101

Reading and Teaching the New Testament

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Waterloo Site

A study of the literary genres, the history of composition, and the canonization of the New Testament texts. The course will examine various hermeneutical approaches to the New Testament, focusing on their implications for Christian theological interpretation.  It will introduce some methods of teaching he New Testament in various settings.

Schedule: Monday, 09:00 to 11:50
Instructors: Alicia Batten
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

9:00 to 12:00

RGT5556HS  L0101

Seminar: Understanding Aquinas on his own Terms

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This is a seminar in practical exegesis of the Thomistic writings. We will review: questions of historiography and historical context; medieval theory of language, including the practices of grammar, dialectic and rhetoric; pedagogical practices of the university; Aquinas' use of philosophical tools for understanding (Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics); key principles of theological method according to Aquinas (science, contemplation, wisdom); kinds of writings and their responsible exegesis. The seminar meets for three hours a week, and relies heavily on in-class exercises. In addition to students preparing for the disciplined theological or historical study of Aquinas, this seminar will be of interest to any student seeking to develop those skills that assist in the understanding of the great ancient and medieval classics of theology.

Schedule: Monday, 9:00 to 12:00
Instructors: Gilles Mongeau
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 16 · Crosslisted to: Historical

09:00 to 15:00

RGT2810HS  L0101

Pastoral Competency

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A review of the moral, pastoral and canonical principles of sound ministerial practice in the Roman Catholic tradition, along with an intensive practicum. Online component, lecture, discussion, tutoring. For lay students and ordination candidates in the M.Div. program at Regis College only. Oral Examination for pass/fail credit. Prerequisite: permission of the Regis College M.Div. Director.

 

Schedule: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, 09:00 to 15:00 · Begins: 04/13 · Ends: 04/21
Instructors: Gilles Mongeau
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 12

09:30 to 16:00

WYP3623HS  L0101

No Longer Children: Teaching, Worship and Formation

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will explore and develop a coherent understanding of teaching in the church which incorporates preaching and teaching and the way they are integrated with the worship, ministry and mission of the church. This will involve an understanding of the relationship between knowledge and practice and the relationship between character formation, ministry and mission. We will engage with the place and role of continuing education (catechesis) primarily for adults in the context of the life, witness and work of the local church community.

Schedule: Monday, 09:30 to 16:00
Instructors: Peter Robinson
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 10
Enrollment Notes: Successful completion of WYP3622H is required to register for this course.This course is a pre-requisite to course WYP3624H
Additional Notes: This course is part of the Missional Leadership and Formation cohort program.

10:00 to 17:00

EMP3559HS  L0101

Ministry With Dying And Grieving Persons

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course offers students an opportunity to combine classroom learning with field-based inquiry on a range of approaches to grief ministry. Students will bring to class ministry narratives, verbatim reports, or interview results for dialogue with the readings and with classmates. Classes will combine a variety of learning methodologies including personal reflection, seminar discussions, audio-visual resources and some lectures. Course requirements: attendance, participation, field research, written work. Prerequisite: basic course in Pastoral and Theology, or permission of the instructor.

Schedule: Monday, 10:00 to 17:00
Schedule Notes: January 05, 19 and February 02 & 23 only
Instructors: Anne L. Simmonds
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

11:00 to 13:00

SAH2002HS  L0101

Medieval Christianity (600-1500)

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Development of Church and society in the Middle Ages; its development of thought and piety. Lectures, discussions, minor paper, major paper, final exam.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: James (Séamus) P. Hogan
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 14
WYJ1111HS  L0101

The Word is Near You: Scripture, Reading and Romans

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This is a foundational course in theological exegesis. It explores the implications of reading Scripture as Word of God, as witness to the gospel, and as dramatic 'script' for the church's mission. It poses the fundamental question "what does it mean to read a text?" in particular contexts of interpretation. As a text case, we will spend several weeks engaged in close reading of Paul's letter to the Romans.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: J. Glen Taylor, Robert L. Knetsch
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Tutorial
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGB3902HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/04/29

Interpreting the Bible in the Early Church: First Four Centuries

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will examine the methods of biblical interpretation used in the Church from NT times through the 4th century. Areas covered will include the Jewish forms of exegesis found in the NT, the ellegorical method, the schools of Antioch and Alexandria, as well as interpreters such as Origen, Theodore of Mopsuestia, and St. Augustine. Course will consist of lectures, the reading of some introductory secondary works, and selected readings from Patristic commentaries. There will be two short essays and one longer final essay.

AD students enrol in RGB6902HF.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Scott M. Lewis
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 30
Enrollment Notes: Max 42 (AD & BD)
RGB6902HF  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/04/29

Interpreting the Bible in the Early Church: First Four Centuries

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will examine the methods of biblical interpretation used in the Church from NT times through the 4th century. Areas covered will include the Jewish forms of exegesis found in the NT, the ellegorical method, the schools of Antioch and Alexandria, as well as interpreters such as Origen, Theodore of Mopsuestia, and St. Augustine. Course will consist of lectures, the reading of some introductory secondary works, and selected readings from Patristic commentaries. There will be two short essays and one longer final essay.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGB3902HF.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Scott M. Lewis
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 30
Enrollment Notes: Max 42 (AD & BD)
SAT2242HS  L0101

Christology

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Answering Jesus' question: "Who do people say I am?", course uses Old Testament expectations, New Testament data, Conciliar definitions and contemporary issues. Lectures, mid-term test, final exam.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Josephine Lombardi
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
KNB1002HS  L0101

Introduction to Biblical Hebrew II

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course is the second of two courses designed to introduce the student to the basics of biblical Hebrew grammar and syntax. It is intended for both those who wish to acquire Hebrew for use in ministry and for those who intend to go on to advanced academic degrees. Lecture. Evaluation will include quizzes, workbook exercises, mid-term and final exams.

Schedule: Monday, Wednesday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Brian Irwin
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRP6120HS  L0101

The Book of Common Prayer

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

After the Bible, the Book of Common Prayer (BCP), in its various revisions, is the most important foundational text of Anglican Christianity; Often praised for its literary beauty and influence, it has nevertheless become unfamiliar or even offensive to Anglicans who worship mainly with new liturgies produced in recent decades; This course will explore the sources and historical development of the Prayer Book tradition from the sixteenth to the twentieth century, the BCP's importance in the history of doctrinal controversy and Anglican identity, and how the BCP's liturgies have been variously received and interpreted over time, including critiques by modern liturgical scholarship; Major themes: the Bible and worship; liturgical language; the sacraments; sin and repentance; individual and community; ecclesiology and ecumenism; the BDP and churchmanship

Basic Degree students enrol in TRP3120HS.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Jesse Billett
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Historical
Additional Notes: Location: Trinity Building, TC22
TRP3120HS  L0101

The Book of Common Prayer

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

After the Bible, the Book of Common Prayer (BCP), in its various revisions, is the most important foundational text of Anglican Christianity; Often praised for its literary beauty and influence, it has nevertheless become unfamiliar or even offensive to Anglicans who worship mainly with new liturgies produced in recent decades; This course will explore the sources and historical development of the Prayer Book tradition from the sixteenth to the twentieth century, the BCP's importance in the history of doctrinal controversy and Anglican identity, and how the BCP's liturgies have been variously received and interpreted over time, including critiques by modern liturgical scholarship; Major themes: the Bible and worship; liturgical language; the sacraments; sin and repentance; individual and community; ecclesiology and ecumenism; the BDP and churchmanship

AD students enrol in TRP6120HS.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Jesse Billett
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Crosslisted to: Historical
Additional Notes: Location: Trinity Building, TC22
KNT5651HS  L0101

Ecumenical Missional Ecclesiology

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will examine the development of Ecumenical Missional Ecclesiology in the 20th and 21st century with a focus on the dimensions of missional ecclesiology for the North American context. The course will explore the theological origins of ecumenical missional ecclesiology, the biblical and hermeneutical dimension of such theology, the present context and its relationship to such ecclesiology and the direction of ecumenical missional ecclesiology. Evaluation: Seminars, papers. Prerequisite: AD program enrolment.

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Instructors: Charles James Fensham
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRP2809HS  L0101

Music and Christian Identity in Global Context

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course aims to create an ecumenical and interdisciplinary discourse on the practice of church music which is an important factor in shaping Christian identity from a global perspective. We shall examine various issues pertaining to the role of music in contemporary Christian performance and explore the musical enterprises that represent the ethnic and national identities of World Christianities and of migration or diaspora Christianities. Topics covered will include the enculturation of Christian worship and music, music and popular religious culture, the globalization of church music, cultural hybridity and inclusivity in Christian music, and the encounter of indigenous musico-religious culture and traditional church music in the non-Western world; Method: lectures, seminars, music listening, readings. Evaluation: Class participation (20%): Review (Book) (20%); Review (Worship) (30%); Presentation (30%)

Schedule: Monday, 11:00 to 13:00
Schedule Notes: This course has previously been taught with the course code TRT2609H
Instructors: Hyun-Ah Kim
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 212

Afternoon Courses

13:00 to 14:20

CGT2230HS  L4101

The Radical Reformation

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Waterloo Site

A study of Anabaptism and its place in the history of the Christian Church and of the reformation period.

Schedule: Monday, Wednesday, 13:00 to 14:20
Instructors: Troy D. Osborne
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

14:00 to 16:00

TRT2953HS  L0101

Biblical Theology in the Shadow of Empire

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  New Course · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course seeks to engender a biblical theology in the shadow of empire. In all times of history, the people of God are called to navigate a covenantal faith in the midst of conflicted visions of life and cultural practice. The biblical narrative is shaped, lived and told anew in contest with other grand narratives, overwhelmingly imperial in character. What does the reign of God look like when set in the context of other hegemonic claims to sovereignty? That is a question that resonates throughout the biblical witness and needs to be asked of every generation.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Brian Walsh
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
RGT6745HS  L0101

Issues in the Philosophy of Religion and The Brothers Karamazov

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course explores issues in the philosophy of religion, with special reference to The Brothers Karamazov. Major themes include: the existence and nature of God, religious language, religious experience, faith and reason, the problem of evil, religion and morality, and afterlife beliefs. Readings include Fyodor Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov and selections from theologians and philosophers of religion. Lectures, discussion, participation, and critical reflection papers.

Basic Degree students enrol in RGT3745HS.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Michael Stoeber
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 24
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
RGT3745HS  L0101

Issues in the Philosophy of Religion and The Brothers Karamazov

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2011 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course explores issues in the philosophy of religion, with special reference to The Brothers Karamazov. Major themes include: the existence and nature of God, religious language, religious experience, faith and reason, the problem of evil, religion and morality, and afterlife beliefs. Readings include Fyodor Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov and selections from theologians and philosophers of religion. Lectures, discussion, participation, and critical reflection papers.

AD students enrol in RGT6745HS.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Michael Stoeber
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 24
Enrollment Notes: Max 24 (AD & BD)
WYP2209HS  L0101

Missional Spirituality

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

A missional spirituality is, "an attentive and active engagement of embodied love for God and neighbour expressed from the inside out." (Helland and Hajalmarson, 2011). In modern spiritualties the interior life of personal devotion is emphasised. A needed corrective is our recovery of the outward movement of God into the world: missio Dei. The life of devotion and mission are inseparable. We are formed by the Spirit in community for the sake of others, where inner life both forms and feeds mission. Requirements include book reviews, a reflective journal, and an integrative paper.

This course is open to all basic degree students and is a required course for Wycliffe students in the MDIV Pioneer stream.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Marilyn Draper
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 30
TRT5579HS  L0101

Kierkegaard's Studies

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Central ideas in the Kierkegaard corpus and their relevance to contemporary theological and philosophical concerns. Introductory lecture, seminar discussion of readings, discussions, one major term paper.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Abrahim H. Khan
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 341
SMP3124HS  L0101

Eucharist: Liturgy & Theology

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2008 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

This course will survey the origins and historical development of eucharistic rites in both East and West, with special attention to the interaction between the liturgy and the development of eucharistic theology. It will proceed to an evaluation of contemporary rites, particularly the Roman Missal, and implications for ecumenical dialogue and pastoral practice.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Christian McConnell
Teaching Methods: Lectures, Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SAT2707HS  L0101

Introduction to Moral Philosophy

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

An examination of three different approaches to ethics. First, we will look at the foundations of Western morality through reading Plato's Gorgias; second, at Nietzsche's attack on Western morality in Beyond Good & Evil; and third at Aquinas' treatment of the virtues. Lectures, discussions, short papers, final exam.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Sean Mulrooney
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TRP5105HS  L0101

Advanced Topics in Medieval Liturgy

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Against the backdrop of revived enthusiasm for "Traditional Latin Liturgy” in parts of the Catholic Church in recent years, this course will invite students to a deep engagement with the historical processes that transformed the loosely organized local liturgical traditions of early medieval Rome and Gaul into a sophisticated pan-European rite.  Close study of the various annual cycles of prayers, readings and chants of the Mass and Divine Office, along with the external religious and political pressures that shaped their development over time, will be combined with an investigation of how liturgists and ordinary worshippers of different periods during the Middle Ages interpreted their liturgies as a unified system that both expressed theological truth and was itself a fitting object of theological reflection.

Prerequisites: an introductory course on medieval liturgy (e.g. TRH 3725HS or MST 3501F); basic knowledge of the Latin language (such as could be acquired by taking SAJ 1501HY or MST 1000Y); and the ability to make use of secondary literature in either French or German (for research towards the final course paper).

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Jesse Billett
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 212
WYT3805HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/08/05

Postmodernity and a Christian Worldview

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Postmodernity as a cultural phenomenon, implications in various areas of cultural endeavour (including politics, philosophy, psychology, theology, the arts, and science), and work toward an integral Christian worldview that gives guidance in a post-modern world. A particular concern will be to plumb the resources of Scripture for such a cultural context. Teaching method: seminars, lectures, multimedia. Evaluation is based upon essays (one 5-7 page essay, one 15-20 page essay)and participation.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: Brian Walsh
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
SAP3161HS  L0101

Liturgical Presidency

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · St. Augustine's (2661 Kingston Rd.) Scarborough Site

This course is intended to prepare candidates for ordination to preside at the liturgical celebrations of the Roman Rite. Requirements: class attendance, practicums, mid-term and final exam. Prerequisite: one liturgy course.

Schedule: Monday, 14:00 to 16:00
Instructors: John-Mark Missio
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

16:00 to 18:00

EMB2014HS  L0101

Biblical Hebrew II

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The goal of Biblical Hebrew I and its adjoining course Biblical Hebrew II is to provide both students training for designated ministry and those students who wish to continue in advanced degree studies with a working knowledge of biblical Hebrew. The acquired skills may be used for the purposes of homiletical exegesis, scholarship pursuit, and the general pleasure of textual theological interpretations. Classes are twice weekly, and consist of lecture, homework tutorial, quizzes and quiz review, translation work, and theological reflections posted on Twitter. Evaluation: weekly quizzes; midterm exam; attendance and participation; final exam.

Schedule: Monday, Wednesday, 16:00 to 18:00
Instructors: Carmen Palmer
Teaching Methods: Seminars
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 5

16:30 to 18:30

RGT5578HS  L0101

Lonergan's Method in Theology

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The course introduces five aspects of advanced theological research through a critical reading of Bernard Lonergan's Method in Theology. Lonergan's methodological approach is exemplified and complemented by rhetorical analysis, genetic analysis, source reading, clarification by contrast and systematic reasoning. Readings, bulletin board participation, critical book review, seminar, major paper.

Schedule: Monday, 16:30 to 18:30
Instructors: John Dadosky
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 22

17:00 to 20:00

SMB1501HS  L0101

Introduction to the New Testament

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Introduction to the major methods and issues in the interpretation of the Gospels: the world of the New Testament; the composition, structure and theologies of the Gospels; traditions behind the Gospels; the Jesus of History and the Christ of Faith. Weekly lectures and tutorials; assigned papers and exam.

Schedule: Monday, 17:00 to 20:00
Instructors: Ryan Wettlaufer
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

18:00 to 20:00

EMP2731HS  L0101

Ministry of Governance and Administration

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

The responsibility of good administration and informed governance is a vital, if unsung, aspect of ministry in a conciliar system. This course will explore the mandates of collaborative congregational leadership, financial stewardship, effective communication and mission strategy in the context of current and emerging forms of United Church polity, and in view of the impact of changing demographics. Lectures and discussions. Evaluation by portfolio and take-home exam.

Schedule: Monday, 18:00 to 20:00
Instructors: Ian Manson
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

19:00 to 21:00

TRP2665HS  L0101

Life and Death in the Wilderness: Skills for Congregational and Communal Life and Leadership

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

We will imagine the book of Numbers as a "?dream' (nightmare?) experience that can teach us about the kinds of skills communities and their leaders require to cope with life and death in a risk-filled environment. At its promptings we will explore specific congregational leadership issues including, planning, assessing resources, drawing forth, developing and changing volunteer leadership, mission, building vision and making change, recognizing and nurturing what gives a community life, coping with the reality of communal death, and above all, the life and death risk of traveling with the living God. Requirements: Lectures, readings, group discussions, practical skill-building projects, and short papers.

Schedule: Monday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Walter Deller
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
Additional Notes: Location: Larkin Building, room 213
SMH2010HS  L0101 · Cancelled on 2014/06/26

History of Christianity II (843-1648)

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2014 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Development of thought and piety; monasticism and mendicants; crusades, parish life; papacy, princes and church councils; Byzantium; East-West relations; relations with Jews and Muslims; Renaissance and reformations; reformers; missionary expansion; confessionalism. Lectures and class discussion of readings. One research essay, one reflection paper. NOTE: Students who have taken - H2002H Medieval Christianity (600-1500) and/or - 2003H Reformation & Early Modern Christianity may not take Christianity II (843-1648).

Schedule: Monday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors:
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Max: 25
SAP3606HS  L0101

Lay Ministry in the Diocesan Church

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2013 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Designed for the Lay Ministry in the Roman Catholic Church. Topics include an overview of theology, sociological context; Church context and pastoral aspects; an overview of lay ministry opportunities in the Church/world; ecclesiological and sacramental principles, and the rights and obligations of lay ministers. Lectures, class participation, six one-page reflection papers, and one short essay. Prerequisite: one year of theology or by permission of the instructor.

Schedule: Monday, 19:00 to 21:00
Instructors: Josephine Lombardi
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit · Min: 8

19:00 to 22:00

TRH2401HS  L0101

Medieval Eastern Thought, Doctrine, and Theology: from Chalcedon to Palamas

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Development of "Byzantine" and "Oriental" Orthodox mentalities and doctrines after the monophysite controversy and Council of Chalcedon; failure to heal this rift in theology for the next 200 years, even by two more ecumenical councils. Other theological issues of the period: grace and faith, epistemology and hesychasm, the Creed, and filioque. Selections from key Fathers of this era and from documents of 4th - 6th Councils.

Schedule: Monday, 19:00 to 22:00
Instructors: Richard Schneider
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit
TSH2401HS  L0101

Medieval Eastern Thought, Doctrine, and Theology: from Chalcedon to Palamas

Offered in Winter 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2012 · Toronto (St. George Campus) Site

Development of "Byzantine" and "Oriental" Orthodox mentalities and doctrines after the monophysite controversy and Council of Chalcedon; failure to heal this rift in theology for the next 200 years, even by two more ecumenical councils. Other theological issues of the period: grace and faith, epistemology and hesychasm, the Creed, and filioque. Selections from key Fathers of this era and from documents of 4th - 6th Councils.

Schedule: Monday, 19:00 to 22:00
Instructors: Richard Schneider
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: Second Semester · One Credit

47 Queen's Park Crescent East · Toronto, Ontario · M5S 2C3 · Canada · Tel: 416-978-4039 · Fax: 416-978-7821 · E-mail: inquiries @ tst.edu
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Course Timetable for Monday: Winter of 2015

Course Timetable for Monday: Winter of 2015