Online Courses for the 2015 Summer Session

KNP1446HF  L6101

Educational Ministry of the Church

Offered in Summer 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2015 · Online Course

What is educational ministry? How can we reshape Christian Education in our congregation in order to revitalize the church and society? Exploring the structure of educational theory, reflecting one's educational experience in the church, engaging in dialogue with theorists in Christian Education, we will attempt to refashion christian Education for today's church, and create a vision of Christian education in order to revitalize the congregation.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: 05/04 · Ends: 06/26
Instructors: Nam Soon Song
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
SAT1905HF  L6101

Moral Theology

Offered in Summer 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2014 · Online Course

Introduction to Catholic moral theology: scripture, tradition, natural law, faith ; morality; moral norms ; virtue; conscience ; magisterium. Discussions, readings, short reflection papers, exam.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: 04/20 · Ends: 07/13
Instructors: Peter Gittens
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 25
Enrollment Notes: Registration Deadline is: April 13, 2015   Withdrawal Deadline: May 13, 2015
SAT2401HF  L6101

Ecclesiology

Offered in Summer 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2015 · Online Course

The mystery of the Church as seen in the light of Vatican II. Her foundation in Christ in Scripture and history that gives rise to her structure, mission, and four Marks. Mary as the Mother of the Church and eschatological icon. One midterm test, one mini-synthesis and a final oral examination.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Josephine Lombardi
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 25
SAT2401HF  L6101

Ecclesiology

Offered in Summer 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2015 · Online Course

The mystery of the Church as seen in the light of Vatican II. Her foundation in Christ in Scripture and history that gives rise to her structure, mission, and four Marks. Mary as the Mother of the Church and eschatological icon. One midterm test, one mini-synthesis and a final oral examination.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: 04/20 · Ends: 07/13
Instructors: Josephine Lombardi
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 8 · Max: 25
Enrollment Notes: Registration Deadline is: April 13, 2015   Withdrawal Deadline: May 13, 2015
TRP2810HF  L6101

Ministry and Technology

Offered in Summer 2015  ·  Previously offered in Summer 2014 · Online Course

Is it legitimate to use technology to communicate the gospel? Explores the function and use of the tools of technology in the varied ministry of the church. Asks critical questions about technology and its use. In the context of addressing issues such as virtual community, media arts and worship, internet-based ministry, Christian education and youth ministry, and spirituality online, the course seeks to equip students with skills in this new area of ministry. Discussion forums, online projects, reflections paper.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: 04/13 · Ends: 06/05
Instructors: Thomas P. Power
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Enrollment Notes: Withdrawal Deadline: May 04, 2015
TRH1010HF  L6101

History of Christianity I (to AD 843)

Offered in Summer 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2015 · Online Course

From the subapostolic age to the "Triumph of Orthodoxy" in the East and the Carolingian revival and Treaty of Verdun in the West. Geographical expansion of the church; the relation of Christian faith to cultural settings and other religions; the development of doctrinal and ethical positions; forms of Christian life and worship; the rise of Islam.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: 06/22 · Ends: 07/26
Instructors: Brian A. Butcher
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Max: 20
Enrollment Notes: Widthdrawal Deadline: June 30, 2015
WYB2671HF  L6101

The Gospel of John

Offered in Summer 2015  ·  New Course · Online Course

This course will introduce the student to the text of the Gospel of John and its place in ancient and modern studies, including such issues as textual base, compositional history, social context, literary character, reading strategies, and theological application.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: 05/04 · Ends: 06/26
Schedule Notes: last day to drop without penalty: May 18, 2015
Instructors: Ryan Wettlaufer
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 10 · Max: 22
Additional Notes: Priority access to online classes will be given to students who are outside commutable distance to the college. Students who have reasonable access may be requested to release space for students at a distance
WYT2675HF  L6101

Theology of Mission: A Global Perspective

Offered in Summer 2015  ·  New Course · Online Course

This course explores how our understanding of God and His Mission informs the very identity and mission of the church in the world. Three interrelated concepts-mission, evangelism, and theology-will be considered thematically in different contexts. The basic contention is that these three themes are and should be inseparable, and yet are distinct; and that if the church is to be true to itself none of these stands in isolation from the other.

There are two governing themes: first, the biblical insight that mission originates with God. Christian tradition has always understood that God's grace is at work in the world; indeed, in the vocation to mission, the focus is not on what we do, but what God has done and is doing in the world in and through the unique, exclusive and saving ministry of Christ. Attention to the entire biblical narrative is foundational; it guards us from any naive assumption that we can build how we think of mission on conveniently selected verses from the Bible.

The second major theme of the course reflects on the church as intrinsically missionary-called to be so by God because God Himself is always reaching out in mission to humanity. Because the very identity of the church is missionary, having received that mandate from God, the church needs to take the world and its struggles seriously.

The course analyzes the changing landscapes and context of contemporary mission, within the wider context of mission history and in the succession of various paradigms within that history. These two themes will be the lenses through which we look at the relationship between the church and the world in our time, wrestling with the question of what it means to be missional in the 21st century.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: 06/29 · Ends: 08/21
Instructors: Girma Bekele
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 10 · Max: 22
Enrollment Notes:  Last day to drop without penalty: July 13, 2015
Additional Notes: Priority will be given to students who are outside commutable distance to the college Students who have reasonable access may be requested to release space for students at a distance.
WYH1010HF  L6101

History of Christianity I (to AD 843)

Offered in Summer 2015  ·  Previously offered in Fall 2014 · Online Course

From the subapostolic age to the "Triumph of Orthodoxy" in the East and the Carolingian revival and Treaty of Verdun in the West. Geographical expansion of the church; the relation of Christian faith to cultural settings and other religions; the development of doctrinal and ethical positions; forms of Christian life and worship; the rise of Islam. Class participation, course portfolio, one short essay, and two other academic exercises (choice of reading notes, short papers, weekly quizzes, final exam, etc.).

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Gary Graber
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 10 · Max: 22
Enrollment Notes: Last day to drop without penalty: April 27, 2015
Additional Notes: Priority access will be given to students  who are outside commutable distance to the college. Students who have reasonable access to the college may be requested to release space for students at a distance.
TRH2210HF  L6101

History of Christianity III (1648-present)

Offered in Summer 2015  ·  Previously offered in Winter 2015 · Online Course

This introductory course examines the history of Christianity from the Peace of Westphalia (1648) to the end of the twentieth century. As will be demonstrated throughout the course, the major catalyst for change has been, and continues to be, the constant tension between the inherently static nature of the historic Church and the forces of modernity. Throughout the course we will see how modern culture, which includes but is not limited to, contemporary politics, philosophy, literature, and painting, exercised an overwhelming influence on the development of eighteenth-century, nineteenth-century, and twentieth-century Christianity.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: 05/04 · Ends: 07/26
Instructors: John W. Clarke, Jr.
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit · Min: 5 · Max: 15
ICT3708HF  L6101

Religion and Philosophy at the Extremes of Human Experience

Offered in Summer 2015  ·  New Course · Online Course

John Newton, who wrote the lyrics for" Amazing Grace" in 1772, was the captain of a slave ship prior to entering the clergy. In other words, the man to whom the words "a wretch like me" originally referredwas actually a thoroughgoing wretch, a man who bought and sold human beings for profit. The grace that saved him, meanwhile, first appeared over the course of an extended brush with death: the ship he was on almost sank in a violent North Atlantic gale, then floated at the mercy of the winds and currents for nearly a month before drifting fortuitously onto the coast of Northern Ireland.

We live most of our lives in a state of relative equilibrium, calmly passing through more-or-less predictable sequences of habit and custom, work and play, activity and rest. This course will explore what happens when these predictable sequences vanish, when we no longer know where we are or where we are going, what we should do, who we should strive to become. We will focus in particular on how religion and philosophy operate, both experientially and discursively, when the normal equilibrium of our lives has been shattered. This will involve a comparison between two opposing approaches to theses edges: in short, the very suffering that often seems necessary to open the soul out unto God is often cited as evidence that God cannot possibly exist, that religion is nothing more than a retreat into illusion spurred by the fear of death. Thus, beginning with a comparison between Victor Frankl's account of his experiences in the Nazi death camps, Man's Search for Meaning, and Freud's classic denunciation of religion in The Future of an Illusion, this course explores how the tension between devastation, hope, and despair has played out in various other extremes of human experience.

Schedule: Online Course · Begins: · Ends:
Instructors: Joseph Kirby, Ronald Kuipers
Teaching Methods: Lectures
Other Information: First Semester · One Credit
Enrollment Notes: Please Note: In order to complete your registration for this course, you must contact the ICS Registrar at academic-registrar@icscanada.edu 

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